episodic dyscontrol

episodic dyscontrol

A personality disorder marked by episodes of impulsive aggressiveness disproportionate to precipitating events. Intermittent explosive disorder is a pattern of behavior that may result in serious assaults or destruction of property. See: amok (1)

In recent years the disorder has gained media attention after several instances of aggressive, violent, or homicidal behavior by previously normal high school students resulted in the deaths of classmates, teachers, or family members. The disorder is more common in young men than in women. It is only diagnosable when other causes of violent behavior (such as conduct disorder, cognitive impairment, delirium, hallucinations) or other psychiatric illnesses have been excluded.

Synonym: intermittent explosive disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
Se realizo una busqueda en las bases de datos PubMed, SCIELO, EMBASE y PsycINFO con los siguientes terminos en ingles: intermittent explosive disorder, impulse control disorders [MeSH], episodic dyscontrol syndrome, behavioral outburst, tantrums, anger, aggression, epidemiology, physiopathology y treatment, y se realizaron combinaciones de terminos.
Episodic dyscontrol refers to individuals whose attacks of rage appeared for the first time after a brain insult, or in whom it has been present since childhood or adolescence in association with other developmental defects.
Episodic dyscontrol is important because it is one of the causes of such acts as unpremeditated homicide, suicide, child abuse, spousal abuse, animal abuse, and property destruction.
In one such study of 286 patients with episodic dyscontrol, 94 percent had neurological defects detectable by tests such as EEG or CAT scans.
A 60-year-old man, who suffered from episodic dyscontrol since adolescence, experienced an abrupt personality change after a stroke.
Just as the therapies for illnesses such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and depression have improved by manipulating the levels of certain brain chemicals, the treatment of episodic dyscontrol may be improved by manipulating serotonin levels or pharmacologically stimulating the 5-HT-1B receptors.
Episodic dyscontrol is more common in men than in women, but in the case of women, violence is often related to the premenstrual syndrome.