epiploic appendagitis


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epiploic appendagitis

Inflammation of an epiploic appendage (appendix epiploicae [NA6]), which is a rare cause of focal abdominal pain in otherwise healthy patients; it may be asymptomatic or clinically mimic diverticulitis or appendicitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
1) Epiploic appendagitis has a predominance for the cecum and sigmoid colon.
1) Epiploic appendagitis has a characteristic CT appearance described as an oval fatty mass measuring 1-4 cm in diameter of increased attenuation relative to normal fat.
Segmental omental infarction can be differentiated from epiploic appendagitis by its heterogeneous appearance, medial location with respect to the ascending and descending bowel, and lack of peripheral enhancement.
Secondary epiploic appendagitis is caused by inflammation of adjacent organs, most commonly due to diverticulitis.
Various alternate diagnoses can be suggested by CT scanning; these include: mesenteric adenitis, epiploic appendagitis, diverticulitis, Crohn's disease and caecal carcinoma.
A diagnosis of primary epiploic appendagitis (EA) was made on the CT findings.
Acute epiploic appendagitis may clinically mimic acute diverticulitis or acute appendicitis, as patients frequently present with acute onset, lower-quadrant pain though they are commonly afebrile and without leukocytosis.
Important clinical and radiologic mimics of acute epiploic appendagitis include acute appendicitis, acute diverticulitis, and omental infarct.
By recognizing typical imaging features of epiploic appendagitis, the radiologist plays a central role in preventing needless surgery and facilitating appropriate, conservative management.
The most common sites for epiploic appendagitis are adjacent to the sigmoid colon, descending colon, and right hemicolon.
The hyperattenuation "ring sign" is a classic finding on CT examinations in epiploic appendagitis.
Other differential considerations include appendicitis, omental infarction, and epiploic appendagitis.