epiploic appendagitis


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epiploic appendagitis

Inflammation of an epiploic appendage (appendix epiploicae [NA6]), which is a rare cause of focal abdominal pain in otherwise healthy patients; it may be asymptomatic or clinically mimic diverticulitis or appendicitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fat stranding that is disproportionately more severe than the degree of wall thickening is a finding that suggests inflammatory diseases such as diverticulitis, appendicitis, or epiploic appendagitis.
The clinical differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain depends on age and localization of the pain and includes acute pancreatitis, acute appendicitis, cholecystitis, gastroduodenal ulcer, diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, and other intra-abdominal inflammatory conditions.
Inflammation of epiploic appendices, primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA), is a rare cause of acute abdomen.
CT showed a pericolic oval lesion of fat attenuation with a hyper-attenuating ring and central dot sign in the same region that was diagnostic for epiploic appendagitis (EA); (Figure 2).
Objective: Epiploic appendagitis (EA) is a rare entity caused by the inflammation of the appendix epiploica.
The CT findings were consistent with a diagnosis of epiploic appendagitis.
Preoperative diagnosis is a challenge and mistaken with appendicitis, cholecystitis, diverticulitis, pancreatitis, epiploic appendagitis, incarcerated hernia, duodenal ulcer, ovarian torsion and ectopic pregnancy.
Various alternate diagnoses can be suggested by CT scanning; these include: mesenteric adenitis, epiploic appendagitis, diverticulitis, Crohn's disease and caecal carcinoma.
A diagnosis of primary epiploic appendagitis (EA) was made on the CT findings.
1) Epiploic appendagitis has a predominance for the cecum and sigmoid colon.
Acute epiploic appendagitis presents with acute lower abdominal pain, mimicking acute diverticulitis and acute appendicitis.
Acute epiploic appendagitis may clinically mimic acute diverticulitis or acute appendicitis, as patients frequently present with acute onset, lower-quadrant pain though they are commonly afebrile and without leukocytosis.