epiphysis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to epiphysis: epiphysis cerebri, Growth Plate, atavistic epiphysis, slipped epiphysis

epiphysis

 [e-pif´ĭ-sis] (pl. epi´physes) (Gr.)
1. the end of a long bone, usually wider than the shaft, and either entirely cartilaginous or separated from the shaft by a cartilaginous disk.
2. part of a bone formed from a secondary center of ossification, commonly found at the ends of long bones, on the margins of flat bones, and at tubercles and processes; during the period of longitudinal growth, epiphyses are separated from the main portion of the bone by cartilage. adj., adj epiphys´eal.
Structure and composition of a typical long bone showing the epiphysis. From Copstead, 1995.
epiphysis ce´rebri pineal body.

e·piph·y·sis

, pl.

e·piph·y·ses

(e-pif'i-sis, -sēz), [TA]
A part of a long bone developed from a secondary center of ossification, distinct from that of the shaft, and separated at first from the latter by a layer of cartilage.
[G. an excrescence, fr. epi, upon, + physis, growth]

epiphysis

/epiph·y·sis/ (ĕ-pif´ĭ-sis) pl. epi´physes   [Gr.] the expanded articular end of a long bone, developed from a secondary ossification center, which during the period of growth is either entirely cartilaginous or is separated from the shaft by a cartilaginous disk.
annular epiphyses  secondary growth centers occurring as rings at the periphery of the superior and inferior surfaces of the vertebral body.
epiphysis ce´rebri  pineal body.
stippled epiphyses  chondrodysplasia punctata.

epiphysis

(ĭ-pĭf′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. epiphy·ses (-sēz′)
1. The end of a long bone that is originally separated from the main bone by a layer of cartilage but later becomes united to the main bone through ossification.

ep′i·phys′i·al (ĕp′ə-fĭz′ē-əl), ep′i·phys′e·al adj.

epiphysis

[epif′isis] pl. epiphyses
Etymology: Gk, epi + phyein, to grow
the enlarged proximal and distal ends of a long bone. See also epiphyseal plate. epiphysial [ipif′əsē′əl] , adj.
enlarge picture
Epiphysis

e·piph·y·sis

, pl. epiphyses (e-pif'i-sis, -sēz) [TA]
A part of a long bone developed from a center of ossification distinct from that of the shaft and separated at first from the latter by a layer of cartilage.
[G. an excrescence, fr. epi, upon, + physis, growth]

epiphysis

The growing sector at the end of a long bone. During the period of growth, the epiphysis is separated by a plate of CARTILAGE from the shaft of the bone. The edge of this plate nearest the shaft becomes progressively converted into bone, while the other edge develops new cartilage. In this way, the bone lengthens.

epiphysis

the ossified part of the end of a mammalian limb bone or vertebra which, during growth, is separated by a plate of cartilage from the rest of the ossified bone. When growth is complete the epiphysis fuses with the rest of the bone. Compare DIAPHYSIS.

epiphysis

the end of a growing bone. Separated from the shaft by the epiphyseal cartilage, which becomes ossified to form a solid bony connection when growth ceases. Before this is complete, the junction with the shaft can be confused with a fracture line on X-ray. epiphyses pl, epiphyseal adj .

epiphysis

that part of a long bone developing from a non-shaft centre of ossification and separated from it by a layer of cartilage

e·piph·y·sis

, pl. epiphyses (e-pif'i-sis, -sēz) [TA]
Part of long bone developed from secondary center of ossification, distinct from that of the shaft, and separated at first from the latter by a layer of cartilage.
[G. an excrescence, fr. epi, upon, + physis, growth]

epiphysis (epif´isis),

n the terminal portion of a long bone. The epiphysis is separated from the diaphysis during growth by a cartilaginous zone that serves as a growth center. Once ossification unites the epiphysis with the diaphysis, growth is completed.

epiphysis

pl. epiphyses [Gr.]
1. the end of a long bone, usually wider than the shaft, and either entirely cartilaginous or separated from the shaft by a cartilaginous disk.
2. part of a bone formed from a secondary center of ossification, commonly found at the ends of long bones, on the margins of flat bones, and at tubercles and processes; during the period of growth epiphyses are separated from the main portion of the bone by cartilage.

epiphysis cerebri
pineal body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica also enters into the differential diagnosis for osteochondromas of the lower extremity; however, even if microscopically the 2 entities are indistinguishable, dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica affects the epiphysis, whereas osteochondromas are never centered in the epiphysis but involve the metaphysis or metadiaphysis.
Figure 1 also shows spongy bone that occurs at the epiphysis and consists of trabeculae or shelves of bone.
Proteoglycan synthesis: The proteoglycan synthesis was measured in the tibia epiphysis as the incorporation of [sup.
Compared to the control, trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) in the femur epiphysis and tibia proximal metaphysis was reduced by 50% and 70% respectively in the Dex group (Fig.
OMNH A1 A2 A4 A6 A7 A8 A9 A10 A11 A12 A13 73854 (a) 73 66 63 35 20 26 20 46 44 35 50 73855 86 75 75 33 20 23 19 40 45 34 51 73856 85 76 72 31 20 21 19 42 43 34 [53] 74672 81 75 73 37 20 24 20 39 40 30 49 (a) This specimen might be from a young animal, and it is missing its proximal epiphysis.
epiphysis or at the distal articular condyle, whichever was wider; however, a more accurate equation might be developed with a single, consistent measurement.
34) Reparative processes in the epiphysis involve increased vascularity, vasodilatation, greater capillary permeability, and diffusion, all of which increase gadolinium uptake.
Task titanium implants for fracture at the epiphysis of the humerus, femur and tibia + instruments for lending.
Mr Evans, who suffers from slipped upper femoral epiphysis, claims the disabled space outside his bungalow is being abused by drivers without a blue badge.
The mass was centered on the distal ulnar meta-diaphysis with extension to the epiphysis and an extra-osseous soft tissue mass elevating the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon without neurovascular involvement.
Also missing from the skeleton are the left upper arm and shoulder blade, the right femur apart from the proximal epiphysis, the right tibia apart from the distal epiphysis, the whole left tibia and foot, and parts of the bones from both hands.