epiphenomenon


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ep·i·phe·nom·e·non

(ep'i-fĕ-nom'ĕ-non),
A symptom appearing during the course of a disease, not of usual occurrence, and not necessarily associated with the disease.

epiphenomenon

/epi·phe·nom·e·non/ (ep″ĭ-fĕ-nom´ĕ-non) an accessory, exceptional, or accidental occurrence in the course of any disease.

epiphenomenon

(ĕp′ə-fĭ-nŏm′ə-nŏn′)
n. pl. epiphenome·na (-nə)
1. A secondary phenomenon that results from and accompanies another: "Exploitation of one social class or ethnic group by another [is] an epiphenomenon of real differences in power between social groups" (Harper's).
2. An additional condition or symptom in the course of a disease, not necessarily connected with the disease.

ep′i·phe·nom′e·nal adj.
ep′i·phe·nom′e·nal·ly adv.

ep·i·phe·nom·e·non

(ep'i-fĕ-nom'ĕ-non)
A symptom appearing during the course of a disease, not of usual occurrence, and not necessarily associated with the disease.

ep·i·phe·nom·e·non

(ep'i-fĕ-nom'ĕ-non)
Symptom appearing during disease course, not of usual occurrence, and not necessarily associated with the disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Protein S deficiency in HIV associated ischaemic stroke: an epiphenomenon of HIV infection.
We don't know if this is an epiphenomenon or if there's something about the cutaneous toxicity that's allowing the immune response to percolate and fight the underlying cancer," he noted.
Today we'll see, wild epiphenomenon, how to stay under the sky.
This gives him an evenhanded perspective on the conflict, to be sure, but it also, as in the case of the Sabbath School Cards, threatens to reduce the conflict itself to an epiphenomenon, to a mere reflection of a struggle whose real political or ideological roots are elsewhere.
The commitment of those fans (along with the unprecedented success of George Lucas' Star Wars, which may yet turn out to be merely an epiphenomenon of Star Trek) eventually persuaded Paramount to bring Trek to movie theaters in 1979.
Bruce argues that prevailing theories assimilate religion to a larger social context, so that the distinctive political role of religion is often lost in analyses that treat religious belief as an epiphenomenon of ethnicity, class, or economic structures.
Hutcheson, Hume, and the others denied that morality could be reduced to an epiphenomenon of egoism or calculation.
The synchro-diachronic model of language and meaning, built in this paper, presents the 'understandum' as a dynamic and multifaceted epiphenomenon, whose diachrony and synchrony form a whole by continuously merging into each other in a way that makes any strict separation artificial.
The latter perspective defines Christian missions as an epiphenomenon of European imperialism.
The arguments made by other scholars in the book likewise reject the Marxist notion of the state as an epiphenomenon serving the interests of the dominant social group.
Walther describes the contributors as agreeing that humanism was certainly not an epiphenomenon of economic or political forces, nor a construct of later historical reflection but, rather, an irreducible and autonomous historical reality that arose uniquely in Italy as a "aesthetic-social system" constituted by shared values, methods, and stylistic ideals.