inscription

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Related to epigraphy: Inscriptions

inscription

 [in-skrip´shun]
1. a mark or line.
2. the second part of a prescription, the part containing names and amounts of the ingredients.

in·scrip·tion

(in-skrip'shŭn),
1. The main part of a prescription, that which indicates the drugs and the amount of each to be used in the mixture.
2. A mark, band, or line.
Synonym(s): inscriptio
[L. inscriptio]

inscription

/in·scrip·tion/ (-skrip´shun)
1. a mark, or line.
2. that part of a prescription containing the names and amounts of the ingredients.

in·scrip·tion

(in-skrip'shŭn)
1. The main part of a prescription; that which indicates the drugs and the quantity of each to be used in the mixture.
2. A mark, band, or line.

prescription

signed, written formula for a medicinal preparation, made out by a designated practitioner, and consisting of:
  • inscription names and amounts of drugs ordered

  • signature dose and times of dosing

  • subscription designated drug form

  • superscription recipient details

in·scrip·tion

, inscriptio (in-skrip'shŭn, -shē-ō)
The main part of a prescription, which indicates drugs and amount of each to be used in the mixture.

inscription

1. a mark or line.
2. that part of a prescription containing the names and amounts of the ingredients.
References in periodicals archive ?
By the time DVV started the epigraphy project he was already an established name in Nepali historiography as well as in epigraphic studies.
Together with its rich trove of photographs and drawings of inscriptions (many of them done by Rollston himself), this volume is an indispensable resource for any student or scholar interested in the current state of Iron Age Northwest Semitic epigraphy.
Angelos Chaniotis, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitat, Heidelberg: Greek epigraphy, Hellenistic religion and law
Today FAMSI provides grants to scholars in the fields of anthropology, archaeology, art history, epigraphy, ethnography, ethnohistory, linguistics, and related fields.
Petrucci shows how "sacred lay values" (53) were conquered by the Lombards through the appropriation of epigraphy, and how this represented an important part of the process of romanization (52) of this people.
He also emphasizes the importance of epigraphy and iconography for a better and, perhaps, a more fundamental understanding of the development of Maya culture in general and Copan in particular.
And (c) that Chambers' alleged qoppa-like phi is unique in Attic epigraphy may indeed not be a critical and overriding objection, but it is certainly not unimportant.
At Bonn, Ritschl published, with Theodor Mommsen, the Priscae Latinitatis Monumenta Epigraphica (1862; "Epigraphical Records of Ancient Latin"), an edition of Latin inscriptions from the earliest times to the end of the Roman Republic; this work established Ritschl as one of the founders of modern epigraphy.
Who can now seriously study Roman epigraphy, or social history, or prosopography, without having at hand Kajanto's Latin Cognomina (1965) or Solin's Die griechischen Personennamen in Rom (1982) or Solin's and Salomies's Repertorium Nominum Gentilium et Cognominum Latinorum (1988)?
Bengt Odenstedt reviews Richard Morris's book Runic and Mediterranean Epigraphy, with a refreshingly undogmatic mixture of reservation and admiration.
Her new book contains all of the virtues of the first, in terms of skilled interpretation of individual papyri and attention to minute points of detail, but moves beyond this sort of monographic approach to encompass a range of sources and methodologies which include archaeology, iconography, religion, epigraphy, literature, anthropology and sociology.
Part II Text and Language: Contextual epigraphy and XML: digital publication and its application to the study of inscribed funerary monuments, Charlotte Tupman