epignathus

e·pig·na·thus

(ē-pig'na-thŭs),
Unequal conjoined twins in which the smaller, incomplete parasite is attached to the larger autosite at the lower jaw. See: conjoined twins.
[epi- + G. gnathos, jaw]
References in periodicals archive ?
INTRODUCTION: Epignathus is an extremely rare congenital oropharyngeal teratoma that commonly arises from the palate leading to a high mortality secondary to airway obstruction in the neonatal period.
A diverse group of conditions is observed in the developmental anomalies of the nose, these include nasal dermoid, gliomas, encephalocoele, nasal clefts, proboscis lateralis, arrhinia, polyrrhinia, nasopharyngeal teratoma and epignathus.
Anesthetic management for EXIT (ex-utero intrapartum treatment) of a twin gestation: one normal and one with a large epignathus.
Fetus in fetu or giant epignathus protruding from the mouth.
Other terms--choristoma, hamartoma, heterotopia, epignathus, and dermoid--refer to separate, unique entities that are not covered here.
Three dimensional scanning augmented with color blood flow imaging cinched the diagnosis of epignathus.
Three-dimensional scanning augmented with color blood flow imaging cinched the diagnosis of epignathus.
Epignathus is a rare congenital orofacial teratoma.
The final pathological diagnosis supported congenital epignathus (immature teratoma) with intracranial extension.
Differential diagnosis includes teratomas, hemangiomas, cervical meningoceles, thyroglossal duct cysts, esophageal diverticula, dermoid cysts, brachial cleft cysts, epignathus, and congenital goiters.
They may arise from other rare sites which include placenta, fourth ventricle, posterior fossa, orbit and epignathus [3].