epigenome


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epigenome

(e-pij'ĕ-nōm),
Nuclear DNA that is not transcribed to mRNA, making up 90% of the human genome.
[epi- + genome]

epigenome

(ĕp′ĭ-jē′nōm)
n.
The set of heritable chemical changes to an organism's genome, such as DNA methylation or histone modification, that modify gene expression but do not change the DNA sequence itself.

ep′i·ge·no′mic (-jə-nō′mĭk) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
A number of studies now indicate that the epigenome is responsive to external environmental exposures, including the social environment, both during intra-uterine development and after birth.
Professor Denu and his colleagues suggest the study helped to prove that metabolites that are produced by microbes in the gut when fed a plant-based diet are the major communicators to the epigenome.
Researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health Common Fund's Roadmap Epigenomics Program have mapped the epigenomes of more than 100 types of cells and tissues, providing new insight into which parts of the genome are used to make a particular type of cell.
In the last few years, research on the epigenome has shed light on how gene silencing leads to cancer, for instance, and how identical twins with identical DNA sequences can be very different.
The investigators used genomewide bisulfite DNA sequencing of maternal plasma to comprehensively assess the epigenomic profiles of both fetal and maternal epigenomes noninvasively, serially, and on a genomewide scale.
Harper addressed these questions in 1964, minus current questions such as; does the attachment of the DNMT3A epigenome to the Cp6/DNA cause the gene to express a certain disease or condition?
They cover genome, epigenome, proteome, and cell signaling; morphogenetic processes; and signals and switches in lineage specification, tissue differentiation, and organogenesis.
Importantly, epigenetic modifications of both DNA and histones are time- and tissue- or organ-specific; as a result, disruptions of the epigenome can have vastly diverse consequences, depending on the developmental stage and tissue or organ affected.
Substantial evidence is mounting proclaiming that commonly consumed bioactive dietary factors act to modify the epigenome and may be incorporated into an 'epigenetic diet.
15) The combined red light, yellow light, green light pattern of DNA methylation and histone modifications within a given cell creates its epigenome, which provides the molecular explanation for Waddington's original definition of epigenetics.
It is also considered to be an essential nutrient for the epigenome, due to its roles in enzymes that control methylation and 'epigenetically modify DNA and histones' (Tomat 2010).