epidermal

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Related to epidermal necrolysis: erythema multiforme, Steven Johnson syndrome

ep·i·der·mal

, epidermatic (ep'i-dĕr'măl, -der-mat'ik),
Relating to the epidermis.
Synonym(s): epidermic

ep·i·der·mal

, epidermatic (ep'i-dĕr'măl, -mat'ik)
Relating to the epidermis.
Synonym(s): epidermic.

Epidermal

Referring to the thin outermost layer of the skin, itself made up of several layers, that covers and protects the underlying dermis (skin).

epidermal

pertaining to or emanating from epidermis.

epidermal appendage
see hair, claw, hoof, horn, chestnut (1), ergot2, dewclaw, comb, wattle, spur (3), pad, footpad, beak, frontal process, feather (1), cere, scale, fin, antler, bristle (1), wool, mohair, cashmere, angora.
epidermal clefts
slit-like discontinuities in the epidermis that do not contain fluid.
epidermal collarette
a feature of a skin lesion, consisting of an encircling rim of epidermal scale with the free edge toward the central area. May represent the margins of an earlier bulla, vesicle or pustule. Characteristic of bullous pemphigoid.
epidermal crust
a consolidated mass of cellular debris, dried exudate, serum, hair, epidermophytic hyphae. Usually is dry and crumbly but in parakeratosis may have a greasy feel about it.
epidermal cyst, epidermoid cyst
an intradermal or subcutaneous cyst containing keratinizing squamous epithelium. It arises from occluded hair follicles. Called also infundibular cyst, wen.
epidermal dysplasia
abnormal development of individual cells of the epidermis. In West Highland white terriers, a familial skin disease characterized by seborrhea, pruritus, alopecia and lichenification from an early age. Infection by Malassezia spp. is a common feature. See also inherited epidermal dysplasia of calves.
epidermal growth factor
a potent growth factor for both epithelial and fibroblast cells.
epidermal lacunae
see epidermal clefts (above).
epidermal laminae
structures formed of epidermal pegs; part of the interdigitating structure between the dermis and the epidermis. Called also epidermal ridges.
epidermal limbi
the layer of soft, light-colored horn that covers the outer side of the coronary border and merges with the horn of the hoof.
epidermal-melanin unit
a melanocyte and adjacent keratinocytes.
epidermal necrolysis
see toxic epidermal necrolysis.
epidermal nibbles
focal areas of epidermal edema, eosinophils and necrosis; suggestive of ectoparasite injury to the skin.
epidermal papilla
a knob-like projection of the epidermis into the dermis; a touch receptor. Called also tylotrich pad and haarscheiben.
epidermal pegs
see rete pegs.
epidermal renewal time
see keratinocyte transit time.
epidermal ridge
see rete ridge.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe adverse cutaneous drug reaction characterized by epidermal loss and multisite mucositis.
Causes of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis and toxic epidermal necrolysis
Key Words: Steven Johnson syndrome, Toxic epidermal necrolysis, Anticonvulsants, Antibiotics, Clinical outcome
Drug-Induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis.
Material and Methods: Eleven patients diagnosed as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap in Department of Pediatric Allergy in Uludag University School of Medicine were included in this study.
Immunohistochemical expression of apoptotic markers in drug-induced Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis.
The most common was morbilliform drug eruption (50%), which was followed by Stevens-Johnson syndrome (21%), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) (10%), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) (10%).
Declan, from Carshalton, Surrey, was in the Bristol Royal Hospital for Children for seven weeks fighting toxic epidermal necrolysis.
3) The sign is elicited in patients with SSSS, as well as in other conditions, with toxic epidermal necrolysis being the most identifiable.
Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (SJS/TEN) is one of the most uncommon diseases.