epidermal

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Related to epidermal necrolysis: erythema multiforme, Steven Johnson syndrome

ep·i·der·mal

, epidermatic (ep'i-dĕr'măl, -der-mat'ik),
Relating to the epidermis.
Synonym(s): epidermic

ep·i·der·mal

, epidermatic (ep'i-dĕr'măl, -mat'ik)
Relating to the epidermis.
Synonym(s): epidermic.

Epidermal

Referring to the thin outermost layer of the skin, itself made up of several layers, that covers and protects the underlying dermis (skin).

epidermal

pertaining to or emanating from epidermis.

epidermal appendage
see hair, claw, hoof, horn, chestnut (1), ergot2, dewclaw, comb, wattle, spur (3), pad, footpad, beak, frontal process, feather (1), cere, scale, fin, antler, bristle (1), wool, mohair, cashmere, angora.
epidermal clefts
slit-like discontinuities in the epidermis that do not contain fluid.
epidermal collarette
a feature of a skin lesion, consisting of an encircling rim of epidermal scale with the free edge toward the central area. May represent the margins of an earlier bulla, vesicle or pustule. Characteristic of bullous pemphigoid.
epidermal crust
a consolidated mass of cellular debris, dried exudate, serum, hair, epidermophytic hyphae. Usually is dry and crumbly but in parakeratosis may have a greasy feel about it.
epidermal cyst, epidermoid cyst
an intradermal or subcutaneous cyst containing keratinizing squamous epithelium. It arises from occluded hair follicles. Called also infundibular cyst, wen.
epidermal dysplasia
abnormal development of individual cells of the epidermis. In West Highland white terriers, a familial skin disease characterized by seborrhea, pruritus, alopecia and lichenification from an early age. Infection by Malassezia spp. is a common feature. See also inherited epidermal dysplasia of calves.
epidermal growth factor
a potent growth factor for both epithelial and fibroblast cells.
epidermal lacunae
see epidermal clefts (above).
epidermal laminae
structures formed of epidermal pegs; part of the interdigitating structure between the dermis and the epidermis. Called also epidermal ridges.
epidermal limbi
the layer of soft, light-colored horn that covers the outer side of the coronary border and merges with the horn of the hoof.
epidermal-melanin unit
a melanocyte and adjacent keratinocytes.
epidermal necrolysis
see toxic epidermal necrolysis.
epidermal nibbles
focal areas of epidermal edema, eosinophils and necrosis; suggestive of ectoparasite injury to the skin.
epidermal papilla
a knob-like projection of the epidermis into the dermis; a touch receptor. Called also tylotrich pad and haarscheiben.
epidermal pegs
see rete pegs.
epidermal renewal time
see keratinocyte transit time.
epidermal ridge
see rete ridge.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bastuji-Garin S, Rzany B, Stern RS, Shear NH, Naldi L, Roujeau JC: Clinical classification of cases of toxic epidermal necrolysis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and erythema multiforme.
One case-control study from Taiwan reported that 59 of 60 patients who developed Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with carbamazepine had the allele.
Attorney Witzer presented testimony from the treating burn surgeon at Shriner's Burn Center who saved Trejo's life that, in his opinion, TEN was 100% attributable to the active ingredient in Motrin (ibuprofen), which has been known for many years to cause serious skin reactions, including Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN).
Viard I, Wehrli P, Bullani R et al: Inhibition of toxic epidermal necrolysis by blockade of CD95 with human intravenous immunoglobulin.
PATIENTS with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are frequently admitted for care at the burn center of Doctor's Hospital in Augusta, Ga.
Serious: myelosuppression (neutropenia and thrombocytopenia), toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome, hallucination, amnesia, status epilepticus, cerebral haemorrhage, embolism pulmonary, pancytopenia, anaemia (grade 3-4), leukopenia.
She is also suffering from toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome, which has made her visually impaired.
Cases of carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis have been reported among carriers of this allele (Pharmacogenomics 2008; 9: 1543-6).
In cases of the worst variant of the disease, Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, skin comes away in large amounts and there can be a huge risk of infection which can lead to death.
Rare, severe reactions, resulting in Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis can be fatal.
There have been isolated case reports of Steven-Johnson syndrome, Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis and Pemphigus Vulgaris.
Accelerated and delayed reactions are not IgE-mediated and those affected may develop a morbilliform rash, serum sickness, vasculitis, contact dermatitis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis.