epidemicity


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epidemicity

 [ep″ĭ-dĕ-mis´ĭ-te]
the state or quality of being epidemic.

ep·i·de·mic·i·ty

(ep'i-dem-is'i-tē),
The state of prevailing disease in epidemic form.

ep·i·de·mic·i·ty

(ep'i-dĕ-mis'i-tē)
The state of prevailing disease in epidemic form.

epidemicity

the quality of being widely diffused and rapidly spreading throughout a population.
References in periodicals archive ?
Malaria epidemicity of Mewat region, District Gurgaon, Haryana, India: A GIS-based study.
This ratio was complemented by the ratio of epidemicity, in which the numerator was replaced by the greatest spleen index over a 5-year period (2,4).
The epidemiology of poliomyelitis: enigmas surrounding its appearance, epidemicity, and disappearance.
It is not one of the main gastrointestinal tract infectious diseases in Afghanistan, but it is an extremely dangerous disease because of its severity and epidemicity.
As arthropods are dependent on specific climate for their epidemicity and the effect of climate on alteration of the natural cycles are well-documented, there is little doubt that climate change indeed play a role in the transmission dynamics of arboviral diseases.
This study was partly supported by contract LSHM-CT-2003-503413 (Pneumococcal Resistance Epidemicity and Virulence-an International Study) from the European Commission.
In addition, we identified different features of scrub typhus epidemicity, compared with those reported in previous studies (4--7).
Toxin profiles and resistances to macrolides and newer fluoroquinolones as epidemicity determinants of clinical isolates of Clostridium difficile from Warsaw, Poland.
With increasing epidemicity and co-circulation of multiple dengue serotypes, the occurrence of DF and DHF is set to rise.
Moreover, examination of mortality data from the 1920s suggests that within a few years after 1918, influenza epidemics had settled into a pattern of annual epidemicity associated with strain drifting and substantially lowered death rates.
A novel putative enterococcal pathogenicity island linked to the esp virulence gene of Enterococcus faecium and associated with epidemicity.
In Brazil, three geographic zones have been defined where YFV circulates (7) (Figure 1): 1) the region of endemicity, in which the virus is maintained in mobile monkey populations and where human cases are sporadic and rare; 2) transitional zones of emergence, in which contact is frequent between monkey and human populations (and infected mosquito vectors); and 3) regions of epidemicity where the density of susceptible human populations and competent vector species are both high, and the potential for explosive urban outbreaks is great.