epicondylitis


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Related to epicondylitis: Medial epicondylitis

elbow

 [el´bo]
1. the bend of the upper limb; the area around the joint connecting the arm and forearm; see also elbow joint. Called also cubitus.
2. any angular bend.ƒ

The elbow joint connects the large bone of the upper arm, the humerus, with the two smaller bones of the lower arm, the radius and ulna. It is one of the body's more versatile joints, with a combined hinge and rotating action allowing the arm to bend and the hand to make a half turn. The flexibility of the elbow and shoulder joints together permits a nearly infinite variety of hand movements.

The action of the elbow is controlled primarily by the biceps and the triceps muscles. When the biceps contracts, the arm bends at the elbow. When the triceps contracts, the arm straightens. In each action, the opposite muscle exerts a degree of opposing tension, moderating the movement so that it is smooth and even instead of sudden and jerky.

As in other joints, the ends of the bones meeting at the elbow have a smooth covering of cartilage that minimizes friction when the joint is moved. The elbow joint is lubricated with synovia, and its movement is eased by the bursa, a small sac of connective tissue. The bones forming the joint are held together by tough, fibrous ligaments. The “funny bone” is not a bone but the ulnar nerve, a vulnerable and sensitive nerve lying close to the surface near the point of the elbow. Hitting it causes a tingling pain or sensation that may be felt all the way to the fingers.
Disorders of the Elbow. The elbows, like the knees, are continually exposed to bumps, twists, and wrenches. Elbow injuries include fracture of a bone near the joint, dislocation, and tearing of tendons and ligaments. Dislocation and fracture may occur together. arthritis may affect the elbow and make it stiff or impossible to move. Special exercises, manipulation, and heat therapy may be prescribed to help restore flexibility. bursitis can also cause pain in the elbow, often as a result of excessive use of the joint.
Elbow. From Jarvis, 2000.
tennis elbow a term often used for bursitis of the elbow but more accurately referring to tendinitis felt in the outer aspect of the elbow due to inflammation of the extensor tendon attached to the lateral humeral condyle. Rest and heat therapy usually relieve it. It affects both tennis players and others who put stress on the elbow.

ep·i·con·dy·li·tis

(ep'i-kon-di-lī'tis),
Inflammation of an epicondyle.

epicondylitis

(ĕp′ĭ-kŏn′dl-ī′tĭs)
n.
An inflammation of an epicondyle or of the tissues adjacent to it.

epicondylitis

[ep′ikon′dilī′tis]
a painful and sometimes disabling inflammation of the muscle and surrounding tissues of the elbow, caused by repeated strain on the forearm near the medial or lateral epicondyle of the humerus. The strain may result from violent extension or supination of the wrist against a resisting force, such as may occur in playing tennis or golf, twisting a screwdriver, or carrying a heavy load with the arm extended. Treatment usually includes rest, injection of procaine with or without hydrocortisone, stretching and strengthening of the muscle, and, in some cases, surgery to release part of the muscle from the epicondyle. See also golfer's elbow, lateral humeral epicondylitis.

epicondylitis

Orthopedics Inflammation of the elbow due to overuse

ep·i·con·dy·li·tis

(ep'i-kon-di-lī'tis)
Inflammation of an epicondyle, or of associated tendons and other soft tissues, particularly the medial or lateral epicondyle of the humerus.

epicondylitis

See TENNIS ELBOW.

Epicondylitis

A painful and sometimes disabling inflammation of the muscle and surrounding tissues of the elbow caused by repeated stress and strain on the forearm near the lateral epicondyle of the humerus (arm bone).
Mentioned in: Tennis Elbow

ep·i·con·dy·li·tis

(ep'i-kon-di-lī'tis)
Infection or inflammation of an epicondyle, or of associated tendons and other soft tissues.

epicondylitis

(ep´ikon´dəlī´tis),
n a painful repetitive strain injury of the elbow characterized by inflammation or lesions in the muscles or tendons where they attach to the bone. Often known as “tennis elbow” when it affects the outside of the joint or “golfer's elbow” when it affects the inside of the joint.

epicondylitis

inflammation of an epicondyle or of tissues adjoining the humeral epicondyle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Non-operative treatment of medial epicondylitis is similar to the treatment of lateral epicondylitis.
Similar symptoms can occur on the other side of the elbow and this is known as 'golfer's elbow' or medial epicondylitis.
Faldo, 40, is suffering from a complaint called medial epicondylitis more commonly known as 'golfers' elbow.
NASDAQ: BMTI) today announced it initiated enrollment in a Phase II clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of Augment[TM] Chronic Tendinopathy (ACT) as a treatment for lateral epicondylitis, commonly known as tennis elbow.
Europe and Japan Orthopedic Soft Tissue Surgical Procedures Market (Rotator Cuff Repair, Vaginal Prolapse, Lateral Epicondylitis, Achilles Tendinosis Repair, Gluteal Tendon/Trochanteric Bursitis Repair and Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction): Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2014 - 2020 " the U.
Common diagnoses treated include: early joint arthritis, muscle strains, epicondylitis, and Achilles tendinosis.
A commonly syndrome encountered in primary care, sports medicine and orthopedic practice is the degeneration, with or without tears, of tendon enthesis at the origin of the common flexor tendons of the forearm termed the medial epicondylitis.
Positive effect of an autologous platelet concentrate in lateral epicondylitis in a double- blind randomized controlled trial: platelet-rich plasma versus corticosteroid injection with a 1-year follow-up.
Often the tendonitis is referred to as medial or lateral epicondylitis since the site of the pain is focused at the epicondyles of the elbow.
Two of the biggest culprits, carpal tunnel syndrome and lateral epicondylitis ("tennis elbow") both arise from overuse of the wrist or arm, and both can cause not just pain but loss of grip strength along with paresthesias (numbness and tingling).