epicondylalgia

ep·i·con·dy·lal·gi·a

(ep'i-kon-di-lal'jē-ă),
Pain in an epicondyle of the humerus or in the tendons or muscles originating therefrom.
[epicondyle + G. algos, pain]

epicondylalgia

/epi·con·dy·lal·gia/ (-kon″dil-al´jah) pain in the muscles or tendons attached to the epicondyle of the humerus.

ep·i·con·dy·lal·gi·a

(ep'i-kon-di-lal'jē-ă)
Pain in an epicondyle of the humerus or in the tendons or muscles originating therefrom.
[epicondyle + G. algos, pain]

epicondylalgia

(ĕp″ĭ-kŏn-dĭ-lăl′jē-ă) [″ + kondylos, condyle, + algos, pain]
Pain in the elbow joint in the region of the epicondyles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coombes BK, Bisset L, Vicenzino B (2009) A new integrative model of lateral epicondylalgia.
Lucado AM, Kolber MJ, Cheng MS, Echternach JL, Sr (2012) Upper extremity strength characteristics in female recreational tennis players with and without lateral epicondylalgia.
Corticosteroids may offer short-term relief from the symptoms of lateral epicondylalgia, but they significantly increase the risk of recurrence compared with physiotherapy or placebo, a randomized controlled trial has shown.
said the study was not quite the death knell for the use of corticosteroids in the treatment of lateral epicondylalgia, but that other approaches, such as exercise and physiotherapy, should be tried first and if they don't work, then perhaps steroids could be considered, Dr.
Passive joint mobilisation or manipulation has been shown to be effective in disorders such as adhesive shoulder capsulitis, non-specific shoulder pain or dysfunction (Ho et al 2009), shoulder impingement syndrome (Kromer et al 2009), lateral epicondylalgia (Bisset et al 2005), and carpal tunnel syndrome (O'Connor et al 2003).
Bisset L, Paungmali A, Vicenzino B, Beller E (2005) A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials on physical interventions for lateral epicondylalgia.
2006) clearly defined the direction of glide, although referred to Vicenzino (2003) for the prescription of their MWM, which clearly outlines that the glide should be a lateral glide of the forearm for treatment of lateral epicondylalgia.
For the treatment of lateral epicondylalgia the movement was either wrist extension or gripping of the hand (Abbott, Patla & Jensen, 2001; Kochar & Dogra, 2002; McLean et al.
Abbott JH (2001): Mobilization with movement applied to the elbow affects shoulder range of movement in subjects with lateral epicondylalgia.