ephebic

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e·phe·bic

(ĕ-fē'bik),
Rarely used term relating to the period of puberty or to a youth.
[G. ephēbikos, relating to youth, fr. hēbē, youth]

e·phe·bic

(ĕ-fē'bik)
Rarely used term relating to the period of puberty or to a youth.
[G. ephēbikos, relating to youth, fr. hēbē, youth]
References in periodicals archive ?
17) Polinskaya (2003) raises important questions about Vidal-Naquet's notion of liminal space in the Greek ephebeia, suggesting that the ephebe is a metaphorical outlier and observing that border areas in historical Attica (the region in which Athens was located) were not understood as liminal spaces.
There seems to exist a great affinity between these Burkean "screens" and the general background of the process of influence in Bloom's acceptation: the influence that directs to a certain extent the attention of the ephebe represents precisely the textual work of the predecessors, in this case the poems which are grounded in a poetic terminology whereby the worldview is reductively condensed in the text.
45) Pourtant, Eumolpe est loin d'etre un personnage reluisant, comme le montre par exemple le recit qu'il fait de ses manoeuvres de seduction sur le jeune ephebe de Pergame, dans la maison duquel il s'etait introduit et impose comme precepteur pretendument vertueux.
1 KAI ALTHOFF, "PUNKT, ABSATZ, BLUMLI (PERIOD, PARAGRAPH, BLUMLI)" (Gladstone Gallery, New York) The first time I met Kai Althoff, the rakish ephebe was perched expectantly on the edge of a wheelchair, furtively scratching his stigmata.
Mann's novella depicts a middle-aged writer celebrated for his classical restraint who, while on holiday in Venice, falls victim to an obsessive passion for a beautiful ephebe.
The young citizen of poetry, or ephebe as Athens would have called him, is already the anti-natural or antithetical man, and from his start as a poet he quests for an impossible object, as his precursor quested before him>> (10).
An ephebe might venture to ask: What about Faustus, who also favors soliloquies?
of harmonious beauty, the ideal ephebe and young athlete", and the goddess associated with "charm" and "gracefulness"--with the accession of Bacchus and Pan--the Roman equivalent of Dionysus, whose "myths and cults are often violent and bizarre, a challenge to the established social order", and the equivalent of Arcadia, which can "exercise a type of savage and violent possession" (Hornblower and Spawforth 1996: 122, 1587, 479, 1103).
he] knew nothing more shaming and tedious in the literature of [his] contemporaries and near-contemporaries than the maudlin neo-Hellenist cult of the ephebe, with middle-aged men like Wilde and Gide tastefully salivating over sleeping youths and making mawkish comparisons with asphodels and eglantines (Adair, 43).
All in all, it appeared to conform to the severe Greek sculptural style of the early fifth century BC and, indeed, a very similar statue of an ephebe, a young man of military training age, has been discovered on the site of the Sicilian Greek city of Acragas.
Is it really my inability to "deal with the psychotic levels of homophobia in Judeo-Christian history, and today," as Brass asserts, that prevents me from seeing myself in an Etruscan vase painting in which an ephebe holds out a rabbit to a would-be suitor?
Imagine how surprised Southey would have been to learn that Bronte, his admiring ephebe, would win popular and critical acclaim for her fiction writing, and that her literary reputation would one day eclipse his own