eosinophil


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Related to eosinophil: basophil, monocyte

eosinophil

 [e″o-sin´o-fil″]
1. a cell or other element readily stainable by eosin.
2. a granular leukocyte with a nucleus that usually has two lobes connected by a thread of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing coarse, round granules of uniform size. Called also eosinophilic leukocyte.

e·o·sin·o·phil·ic leu·ko·cyte

a polymorphonuclear leukocyte characterized by the presence of numerous large or prominent refractile cytoplasmic granules that are fairly uniform in size and bright yellow-red or orange when treated with Wright or similar stains; the nuclei are usually larger than those of neutrophils, do not stain as deeply, and characteristically have two lobes (a third lobe is sometimes interposed on the connecting strand of chromatin); these leukocytes are motile phagocytes with distinctive antiparasitic functions; they also phagocytose antigen-antibody complexes.

eosinophil

/eo·sin·o·phil/ (e″o-sin´o-fil) a granular leukocyte having a nucleus with two lobes connected by a thread of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing coarse, round granules of uniform size.

eosinophil

(ē′ə-sĭn′ə-fĭl′) also

eosinophile

(-fīl′)
n.
1. A type of white blood cell found in vertebrate blood, containing cytoplasmic granules that are easily stained by eosin or other acid dyes.
2. A microorganism, cell, or histological element easily stained by eosin or other acid dyes.

e′o·sin′o·phil′, e′o·sin′o·phil′ic adj.

eosinophil

[ē′əsin′əfil]
Etymology: Gk, eos, dawn, philein, to love
a granulocytic bilobed leukocyte characterized by large numbers of regular refractile cytoplasmic granules that stain bright orange with the acid dye eosin. Eosinophils constitute 1% to 3% of the white blood cells in peripheral blood films. They increase in number with allergy and some parasitic conditions and decrease with steroid administration. Compare basophil, neutrophil. eosinophilic, adj.
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Eosinophil

e·o·sin·o·phil·ic leu·ko·cyte

(ē'ō-sin-ō-fil'ik lū'kŏ-sīt)
A polymorphonuclear white blood cell characterized by prominent cytoplasmic granules that are bright yellow-red or orange when treated with Wright stain; the nuclei are usually larger than those of neutrophils and characteristically have two lobes; these leukocytes are motile phagocytes with distinctive antiparasitic functions.
Synonym(s): eosinophil, eosinophile, oxyphil (2) , oxyphile, oxyphilic leukocyte.

eosinophil

A kind of white blood cell (leukocyte) containing granules of toxic proteins that readily stain with EOSIN. As in the cases of other classes of white cell (e.g. basophil, neutrophil) this is an adjective that has become a noun.

Eosinophil

A type of white blood cell containing granules that can be stained by eosin (a chemical that produces a red stain).

eosinophil

subpopulation of acid-fast leukocytes

eosinophil (ē´əsin´əfil),

eosinophil

an element readily stained by eosin; specifically, a granular leukocyte with a nucleus that usually has two lobes connected by a thread of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing coarse, round or rod-shaped, eosinophilic granules (lysosomes) of uniform size.
References in periodicals archive ?
A special scan that tracks the movement of eosinophils through the lungs does two things - it helps diagnose asthma in the first place and then shows if the medication the patient has been given is working.
Eosinophils play an important role in the immune system, helping to fight off certain types of infections and parasites.
Additionally, the presence of IL-5 enhances cytotoxic function of the eosinophils against tumor cells in cancer patient (3).
A Eosinophils are produced by the bone marrow, circulate in the peripheral blood for a short time, and eventually localize in various tissues and organs such as the skin, lungs, and G1 tract.
But the UCSF study showed that FAP cells also team up with eosinophils to make injured muscles get stronger rather than fatter, at least in mice.
Eosinophil count was available on the day of ICU discharge in 1394 patients (96.
37) Bone marrow and tissue eosinophilia are also common, although surprisingly, there is no strong correlation with peripheral eosinophil counts.
The white blood cell (WBC) components such as neutrolphil, lymphocyte, monocyte, eosinophil, and basophil, are essential for immune responses in mammalian species.
However, the effect of low concentration of the extract on eosinophil was greater than the effect of two higher concentrations (p < 0.
Eliminating the six most common food s allergens from the diet for 6 weeks reduced by at least half the peak eosinophil counts in 78% of the study subjects.
Eosinophil cell counts and rates in peripheral blood were retrospectively obtained from the complete blood counts (CBC) in 49 KD patients before the IVIG therapy with median 7.

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