eosinopenia


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Related to eosinopenia: basophilia, lymphocytosis, neutrophilia, basopenia

eosinopenia

 [e″o-sin″o-pe´ne-ah]
abnormal deficiency of eosinophils in the blood.

e·o·sin·o·pe·ni·a

(ē'ō-sin-ō-pē'nē-ă),
The presence of eosinophils in an abnormally small number in the peripheral bloodstream.
Synonym(s): hypoeosinophilia
[eosino(phil) + G. penia, poverty]

eosinopenia

/eo·sin·o·pe·nia/ (e″o-sin″o-pe´ne-ah) abnormal deficiency of eosinophils in the blood.

eosinopenia

[ē′əsinəpē′nē·ə]
an abnormally low number of eosinophil leukocytes in the blood.

e·o·sin·o·pe·ni·a

(ē'ō-sin-ō-pē'nē-ă)
An abnormally small number of eosinophils in the peripheral bloodstream.
[eosino(phil) + G. penia, poverty]

eosinopenia

abnormal deficiency of eosinophils in the blood. Commonly associated with stress or the administration of corticosteroids.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, eosinopenia (hazard ratio 2.
Including CRP concentrations at ICU discharge in the final multivariable Cox model also did not change the direction and magnitude of the association between eosinopenia and risk of mortality after ICU discharge (hazard ratio 3.
The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of eosinopenia to predict unexpected re-admission, mortality or either of these adverse events are described in Table 5.
In this study we assessed the incidence of eosinopenia during the recovery phase of critical illness and showed that eosinopenia was not rare (9.
Eosinopenia, unmeasurable eosinophil count, was significantly more common among the cases than the controls (46.
The specificity of eosinopenia to predict bloodstream infection in adult patients was reasonable (79%, 95% CI 74 to 82), but its sensitivity was low (47%, 95% CI 41 to 52).
In contrast to the adult patients, eosinophil count and eosinopenia were not significantly different between paediatric cases and controls (Table 3).
Our results showed that eosinopenia was common (46.
001) suggesting that eosinopenia did not add significant diagnostic information to CRP concentrations.
To the best of our knowledge, this case control study is the first study that compared the ability of eosinopenia and CRP concentrations to predict bloodstream infections in critically ill patients.
These three cytokines are, however, not significantly activated in patients with bacterial or fungal sepsis (17) and as such, eosinopenia is expected in patients with severe sepsis and bloodstream infections (7,9,10).
Although eosinopenia has recently been reported (6) to be a more reliable marker than CRP in diagnosing sepsis in critically ill patients, our results suggest that CRP appears to be a better marker of bloodstream infections than eosinopenia in critically ill patients.