enuresis

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enuresis

 [en″u-re´sis]
a type of urinary incontinence, usually referring to involuntary discharge of urine during sleep at night (nocturnal enuresis or bed-wetting), such as in a child beyond the age when bladder control should have been achieved. adj., adj enuret´ic. It can occur as a result of such organic conditions as structural defects or infections of the urinary tract, neurologic deficit and resultant loss of control, nocturnal epilepsy, diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus, which increase urine flow, and renal disorders that impair the kidney's ability to concentrate urine. If no organic basis can be found for bed-wetting, psychogenic factors are considered.
Patient Care. Efforts to manage enuresis require patience on the part of parents and understanding that the child may be embarrassed by the condition and its effects. Reprimands and punishment are not appropriate and only make matters worse. The child also needs to be encouraged to participate in planning and implementing the program of care and to have hope and confidence that the problem can be overcome.

Among the techniques used to manage nocturnal enuresis are restricting fluids after the evening meal, bladder training to help enlarge the capacity of the bladder, and fully awakening the child once or twice during the night to walk to the bathroom and urinate. Electronic devices that establish a conditioned reflex response to waken the child the moment urination starts are successful in some cases. An anticholinergic drug may be prescribed as an adjunct to any of these techniques. desmopressin acetate nasal spray (DDAVP) may also be used.

en·u·re·sis

(en'yū-rē'sis), Do not confuse this word with emuresis.
Involuntary discharge or leakage of urine.
[G. en-oureō, to urinate in]

enuresis

/en·ure·sis/ (en″ūr-e´sis) urinary incontinence.

enuresis

(ĕn′yə-rē′sĭs)
n.
The involuntary discharge of urine; urinary incontinence.

en′u·ret′ic (-rĕt′ĭk) adj.

enuresis

[en′yoo͡rē′sis]
Etymology: Gk, enourein, to urinate
incontinence of urine, especially nocturnal bed-wetting.

enuresis

Psychiatry Nocturnal and daytime incontinence of urine Vox populi Bed-wetting. See Elimination disorder.

en·u·re·sis

(en-yūr-ē'sis)
Urinary incontinence; particularly nocturnal (i.e., bed wetting).
[G. en-oureō, to urinate in]

enuresis

Bedwetting. The involuntary passage of urine, especially during sleep.

enuresis,

n inability to hold one's urine.

en·u·re·sis

(en-yūr-ē'sis) Do not confuse this word with emuresis.
Involuntary discharge or leakage of urine.
[G. en-oureō, to urinate in]

enuresis (enūrē´sis),

n involuntary urination (e.g., during general anesthesia, at night).

enuresis

References in periodicals archive ?
No significant difference was found between the enuretic children included in our study and the control group in terms of demographic data (Table 1).
The mean age of the enuretic children was significantly younger than that of non-enuretic children (p<0.
Effect of dry bed training on behavioural problems in enuretic children.
Since some children who have sleepdisordered breathing have been shown to also be enuretic at night, enuresis and snoring may be in and of itself a reason for a polysomnographic evaluation.
However, in a minority of enuretic children, especially those who have diurnal or secondary enuresis, the disorder can be triggered by parental divorce, neglect, abuse, or other stressors (Fritz et al.
The bed pads are placed under the sheets of the target enuretic child's bed with the perforated pad on top.
Therefore, if parents take their enuretic child to a pediatrician or family practitioner, the child will likely receive a medical evaluation to rule out the possibility of neurogenic bladder or other conditions that may cause urinary frequency such as diabetes or infection (American Psychiatric Association, 1994).
This is probably one of the reasons why independent bodies were formed solely to take care of enuretic children and their families.
Since some children who have sleep-disordered breathing have been shown to also be enuretic at night, enuresis and snoring may be in and of itself a reason for a polysomnographic evaluation.
The efficacy and low toxicity of desmopressin makes it an attractive choice for pharmacotherapy in enuretic children.
To test this out researchers at the University of Ottawa monitored the sleeping patterns of 15 enuretic boys and 18 boys who didn't wet the bed.