enucleation


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Related to enucleation: marsupialization

enucleation

 [e-noo″kle-a´shun]
removal of an organ or other mass intact from its supporting tissues, as of the eyeball from the orbit.

e·nu·cle·a·tion

(ē-nū'klē-ā'shŭn),
1. Removal of an entire structure (such as an eyeball or tumor), without rupture, as one shells the kernel of a nut.
2. Removal or destruction of the nucleus of a cell.
[L. enucleo, to remove the kernel, fr. e, out, + nucleus, nut, kernel]

enucleation

/enu·cle·a·tion/ (e-noo″kle-a´shun) removal of an organ or other mass intact from its supporting tissues, as of the eyeball from the orbit.

enucleation

[ino̅o̅′klē·ā′shən]
Etymology: L, e, without, nucleus, nut
1 removal of an organ or tumor in one piece.
2 removal of the entire eyeball, performed for malignancy, severe infection, extensive trauma, or control of pain in glaucoma. Local or general anesthesia is used. The optic nerve and muscle attachments are cut; if possible, the surrounding layer of fascia is left with the muscles. A round implant of hydroxyapatite (coralline or syntetic) is inserted, and the muscles are sutured around it, providing a permanent stump to give support and motion to an artificial eye, or an implant of porous polyethylene is inserted, allowing the rectus muscle to be sutured directly to the implant. After surgery, pressure dressings are kept in place for 1 or 2 days to prevent hemorrhage. Other possible complications include thrombosis of nearby blood vessels, which may lead to infection, including meningitis.
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Enucleation

e·nu·cle·a·tion

(ē-nū'klē-ā'shŭn)
1. Removal of an entire structure without rupture, as one shells the kernel of a nut.
2. Removal or destruction of the nucleus of a cell.
[L. enucleo, to remove the kernel, fr. e, out, + nucleus, nut, kernel]

enucleation

Removal from an enveloping capsule, sac or cover. The term is often used for the operation to remove an eyeball.

Enucleation

Surgical removal of the eyeball.
Mentioned in: Eye Cancer, Retinoblastoma

enucleation

removal of clavus/corn from surrounding skin without need for skin incision

enucleation

Removal of an eye from its socket. It is usually performed to reduce pain in a blind eye, when there is a risk of sympathetic ophthalmia following trauma, or when there is a malignant tumour in the eye. Immediately following the operation a spherical implant (made up of hydroxyapatite, polyethylene, or silicone rubber) is placed into the eye socket to be replaced several weeks later by an artificial eye. See evisceration; artificial eye.

enucleation

removal of an organ or other mass intact from its supporting tissues, as of the eyeball from the orbit.

lateral subconjunctival enucleation
involves a lateral canthotomy and a subconjunctival approach to the globe, extraocular muscles and optic nerve.
transpalpebral enucleation
removal of eyelids, conjunctiva and extraocular muscles along with eyeball.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bipolar plasma enucleation of the prostate vs open prostatectomy in large benign prostatic hyperplasia cases--a medium term, prospective, randomized comparison.
Evisceration has been suggested as an alternative to enucleation in birds (5,7,13-16) but has not been described for multiple cases or with long-term follow-up data in birds of prey.
The median age of enucleation for eyes harboring well-differentiated tumors was 1.
Whilst extraction or endodontic treatment may suffice for the treatment of a 'periapical radiolucency', the treatment options for a radicular cyst usually require more radical intervention including surgical removal of the tooth in question and enucleation or marsupialisation of the cyst [Nair, 1998].
Although local control may be achieved with enucleation and/or orbital irradiation, the systemic prognosis is usually poor.
In addition, because caspases are also activated during erythroid maturation and enucleation (9), assays detecting such activity will not serve to distinguish between apoptosis and differentiation.
HoLEP: Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate; PVP: Greenlight Photoselective vaporization of the prostate; TURP: transurethral resection of the prostate.
Due to the size of the tumour and the degree of vision loss, the only viable treatment option was enucleation.
Management options are non-operative (asymptomatic) or operative from enucleation via endoscopic, open or thorascopic methods to oesophageal resection and reconstruction for select tumours (greater than 8cm or adherent to the mucosa etc.
2) Although localized disease is treated with radiotherapy or chemotherapy followed by local ocular therapy with the aim of vision preservation, (3) recent treatment protocols for advanced cases include chemoreduction followed by enucleation.
2) Sympathetic ophthalmitis is prevented by early repair of a penetrating eye injury or enucleation within 2 weeks of injury.
Spermatic cord must be mobilized and atraumatically occluded before enucleation of the tumor.