enterovirus


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Related to enterovirus: adenovirus, enterovirus 71

enterovirus

 [en´ter-o-vi″rus]
any member of a genus of picornaviruses, usually infecting the gastrointestinal tract and being discharged in the feces; included are the polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, enteroviruses, and others. adj., adj enterovi´ral.

En·te·ro·vi·rus

(en'tĕr-ō-vī'rŭs),
A large and diverse group of viruses (family Picornaviridae) that includes poliovirus types 1 to 3, coxsackieviruses A and B, echoviruses, and the enteroviruses identified since 1969 and assigned type numbers. They are transient inhabitants of the alimentary canal and are stable at low pH.

enterovirus

/en·tero·vi·rus/ (en´ter-o-vi″rus) any virus of the genus Enterovirus. enterovi´ral

Enterovirus

/En·tero·vi·rus/ (en´ter-o-vi″rus) enteroviruses; a genus of viruses of the family Picornaviridae that preferentially inhabit the intestinal tract, with infection usually asymptomatic or mild. Human enteroviruses were originally classified as polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, or echoviruses.

enterovirus

(ĕn′tə-rō-vī′rəs)
n. pl. enterovi·ruses
Any of a genus of picornaviruses, including polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, and echoviruses, that infect the gastrointestinal tract and often spread to other areas of the body, especially the nervous system.

en′ter·o·vi′ral adj.

Enterovirus

[-vī′rəs]
Etymology: Gk, enteron + L, virus, poison
a genus of Picornaviridae that preferentially replicates in the mammalian intestinal tract. Kinds of Enteroviruses are coxsackie virus, ECHO virus, and poliovirus. enteroviral, adj.

enterovirus

A genus of picornavirus comprised of more than 100 closely related viruses–eg, coxsackievirus, echoviruses, polioviruses and others, which cause gastroenteritis and viral encephalopathy. See Virus.

En·te·ro·vi·rus

(en'tĕr-ō-vī-rŭs)
A large and diverse group of viruses that includes poliovirus types 1-3, coxsackievirus A and B, echoviruses, and those enteroviruses identified since 1969 that were assigned type numbers.

Enterovirus

Any of a group of viruses that primarily affect the gastrointestinal tract.
Mentioned in: Clubfoot

Enterovirus

a genus of the family Picornaviridae. The genus includes the important animal pathogens of porcine poliomyelitis (Teschen disease), possibly SMEDI disease (see porcine parvovirus), avian encephalomyelitis (epidemic tremor), duckling hepatitis, turkey hepatitis. Equine and bovine enteroviruses of doubtful pathogenicity have also been isolated. Human enteroviruses, e.g. Coxsackie virus, ECHO virus, are also isolated occasionally from animals without appearing to cause disease.

enterovirus

a virus in the genus Enterovirus.

enterovirus encephalitis
several porcine enteroviruses cause highly transmissible encephalitides. See also porcine viral encephalomyelitis (Teschen disease, Talfan disease, poliomyelitis suum).
References in periodicals archive ?
Identification of enterovirus C105 for the first time in New Zealand.
Author affiliations: Enterovirus Research Centre, Mumbai, India (V.
A single nucleotide in stem loop II of 5'-untranslated region contributes to virulence of enterovirus 71 in mice.
The D3 IFA Enterovirus Identification Kit adds a key component to the Diagnostic HYBRIDS Rapid Enterovirus culture system.
While it's common for an enterovirus to circulate each year in the summer and fall, the number of confirmed cases of D68 this year is significantly higher than previous years, according to the CDC.
Novel human enterovirus C infection in child with community-acquired pneumonia.
Dr Schuffenecker is a virologist working at the National Reference Center for Enterovirus and Parechovirus.
There is no specific treatment for Enterovirus D68, so it's important to be aware of its symptoms and make sure that you and your family practice good hygiene to avoid getting the virus.
Enterovirus enfeksiyonlarinin cogu iyi seyirli ve sadece atesle giden, bazen el-ayak-agiz hastaligi (EAAH), her-panjina, plorodini gibi belirgin klinik sendromlar seklindedir (1).
Human enterovirus 71 is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease in children and has caused mortalities in large-scale outbreaks in the Asia-Pacific region in recent years.
Signs of enterovirus infection by 12 months of age were associated with the appearance of type 1 diabetes-associated autoimmunity among children exposed to cow's milk before 3 months of age, but not among those in whom the first exposure to cow's milk was after 3 months of age.
The same viruses present in human wastewater are commonly detected in groundwater: adenovirus, enterovirus, hepatitis A virus, norovirus, and rotavirus.