enterovirus

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enterovirus

 [en´ter-o-vi″rus]
any member of a genus of picornaviruses, usually infecting the gastrointestinal tract and being discharged in the feces; included are the polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, enteroviruses, and others. adj., adj enterovi´ral.

En·te·ro·vi·rus

(en'tĕr-ō-vī'rŭs),
A large and diverse group of viruses (family Picornaviridae) that includes poliovirus types 1 to 3, coxsackieviruses A and B, echoviruses, and the enteroviruses identified since 1969 and assigned type numbers. They are transient inhabitants of the alimentary canal and are stable at low pH.

enterovirus

/en·tero·vi·rus/ (en´ter-o-vi″rus) any virus of the genus Enterovirus. enterovi´ral

Enterovirus

/En·tero·vi·rus/ (en´ter-o-vi″rus) enteroviruses; a genus of viruses of the family Picornaviridae that preferentially inhabit the intestinal tract, with infection usually asymptomatic or mild. Human enteroviruses were originally classified as polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, or echoviruses.

enterovirus

(ĕn′tə-rō-vī′rəs)
n. pl. enterovi·ruses
Any of a genus of picornaviruses, including polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, and echoviruses, that infect the gastrointestinal tract and often spread to other areas of the body, especially the nervous system.

en′ter·o·vi′ral adj.

Enterovirus

[-vī′rəs]
Etymology: Gk, enteron + L, virus, poison
a genus of Picornaviridae that preferentially replicates in the mammalian intestinal tract. Kinds of Enteroviruses are coxsackie virus, ECHO virus, and poliovirus. enteroviral, adj.

enterovirus

A genus of picornavirus comprised of more than 100 closely related viruses–eg, coxsackievirus, echoviruses, polioviruses and others, which cause gastroenteritis and viral encephalopathy. See Virus.

En·te·ro·vi·rus

(en'tĕr-ō-vī-rŭs)
A large and diverse group of viruses that includes poliovirus types 1-3, coxsackievirus A and B, echoviruses, and those enteroviruses identified since 1969 that were assigned type numbers.

Enterovirus

Any of a group of viruses that primarily affect the gastrointestinal tract.
Mentioned in: Clubfoot

Enterovirus

a genus of the family Picornaviridae. The genus includes the important animal pathogens of porcine poliomyelitis (Teschen disease), possibly SMEDI disease (see porcine parvovirus), avian encephalomyelitis (epidemic tremor), duckling hepatitis, turkey hepatitis. Equine and bovine enteroviruses of doubtful pathogenicity have also been isolated. Human enteroviruses, e.g. Coxsackie virus, ECHO virus, are also isolated occasionally from animals without appearing to cause disease.

enterovirus

a virus in the genus Enterovirus.

enterovirus encephalitis
several porcine enteroviruses cause highly transmissible encephalitides. See also porcine viral encephalomyelitis (Teschen disease, Talfan disease, poliomyelitis suum).
References in periodicals archive ?
Future studies could define susceptibility to enteroviruses through the effect of obinutuzumab on B-cell and immunoglobulin function and host defense against enteroviral infections.
Pleconaril revisited: clinical course of chronic enteroviral meningoencephalitis after treatment correlates with in vitro susceptibility.
On the other hand, the number of enteroviral events or laboratory confirmations was 4-fold higher than the number of hospitalizations.
The patient's neurologic condition deteriorated progressively, and she died of enteroviral rhomboencephalitis 32 days after admission.
While severe enteroviral infection made up 17% of all enteroviral infections over the entire study period, the year-to-year proportion varied widely, from no cases in 1998-2000 to a high of 75% in 1994 (three severe, one nonsevere).
Although enteroviruses can be readily isolated from waste waters and occasionally from recreational waters, studies examining the association of enteroviral illness with recreational water use have obtained varying results.
The other members of the enteroviral family that emerge during the summer are the echoviruses 1-34, enteroviruses 68-95, and the picornaviruses.
Cultures for enterovirus followed by enteroviral typing should be considered for all patients with acute flaccid paralysis unless an alternative diagnosis is apparent.
Although the actual incidence of enteroviral diseases is not known, most infections are thought to be asymptomatic, with [approximately not equal to]1% resulting in severe illness with high rates of death, especially in infants and young children (6).
Chronic enteroviral infection is generally associated with B-cell defects.
Reporting of the most prevalent enterovirus serotypes may assist diagnostic laboratories in the rapid identification of enterovirus isolates and public health officials in recognizing and controlling outbreaks of enteroviral disease.
Clinicians should be aware that, although standard precautions are routinely recommended for managing enteroviral infections in health care settings, contact precautions are indicated for children in diapers to control institutional outbreaks (10).