enterotoxemia

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enterotoxemia

 [en″ter-o-tok-se´me-ah]
a condition characterized by the presence in the blood of toxins produced in the intestines.

enterotoxemia

/en·tero·tox·e·mia/ (en″ter-o-tok-se´me-ah) a condition characterized by the presence in the blood of toxins produced in the intestines.

en·ter·o·tox·e·mi·a

(en'tĕr-ō-tok-sē'mē-ă)
The presence of an enterotoxin in the blood.
Synonym(s): enterotoxaemia.
[enterotoxin + G. haima, blood]

enterotoxemia

a condition characterized by the presence in the blood of toxins produced in the intestines.

Clostridium perfringens enterotoxemia
all of the types of C. perfringens cause profound enteroxemia with sudden death as the principal manifestation. The postmortem lesions in type D (pulpy kidney disease) enterotoxemia are minimal especially if the course is short. In types A, B, C and E there is a severe enteritis with diarrhea and dysentery. The diseases are most common in young rapidly growing ruminants but foals and piglets are sometimes affected.
coliform enterotoxemia
see Escherichia coli enterotoxemia (below).
Escherichia coli enterotoxemia
calves with an enteric infection with the relevant serotype of E. coli show sudden collapse, subnormal temperature, coma, slow irregular heart rate, collapse of veins and pale mucosae. The course is short and affected calves die within 2-6 hours. Postmortem lesions are limited to flaccidity of the intestines and the presence of thin, yellow contents.
References in periodicals archive ?
2010) Enterotoxaemia in sheep is a fatal enteric disease and is attributed to a toxigenic type of Clostridium perfringens type D worldwide ( Lyerly et al.
This organism secretes lethal alpha and epsilon toxins which play major role in the production of the disease but epsilon toxin has a significant role in the pathogenesis of enterotoxaemia in ruminants (Popoff, 2011).
Presently, the diagnosis of enterotoxaemia is achieved by clinical and pathological findings, bacterial culture and enzyme linked immune-sorbent assay.
These animals were not vaccinated nor their dams against enterotoxaemia.
Preparation of inoculums: The sample was collected in sterile, tightly closed container from intestinal scrapings on postmortem examination of sheep suspected for enterotoxaemia from Veterinary Research Institute, Lahore.
Smith and Sherman (1994) also found the mean white cell count of 16000/mm3 with individual value reaching up to 47000/mm3 and considered as an aid in diagnosing the enterotoxaemia in living animal.
It seems that increase in blood glucose, urea and creatinine are associated with enterotoxaemia but its level may vary with individual variation and the time elapsed after infection.
The expression of Clostridium perfringens consensus beta2 toxin is associated with bovine enterotoxaemia syndrome.
At the beginning of the experiment, all goats were treated with an effective anathematic and vaccinated against enterotoxaemia.