enterohepatic circulation


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en·ter·o·he·pat·ic cir·cu·la·tion

circulation of substances such as bile salts that are absorbed from the intestine and carried to the liver, where they are secreted into the bile and again enter the intestine.

enterohepatic circulation

(ĕn′tə-rō-hĭ-păt′ĭk)
n.
Circulation of substances such as bile salts, which are absorbed from the intestine and carried to the liver, where they are secreted into the bile and again enter the intestine.

enterohepatic circulation

[en′tərōhəpat′ik]
a route by which part of the bile produced by the liver enters the intestine, is resorbed by the liver, and then is recycled into the intestine. The remainder of the bile is excreted in feces.

en·ter·o·he·pat·ic cir·cu·la·tion

(en'tĕr-ō-hĕ-pat'ik sĭr'kyū-lā'shŭn)
Absorption from the intestine of hepatic products, notably bile salts, by the portal system; secreted again in bile, these may be recycled several times.

enterohepatic circulation

The absorption of bile from the intestine and its return to the liver to be resecreted into the bowel.

circulation

movement in a regular or circuitous course, returning to the point of origin, as the circulation of the blood through the heart and blood vessels. See also circulatory system.

antegrade circulation
circulation in the normal direction of flow.
artificial circulation
is maintained in cardiopulmonary arrest by cardiac compression.
collateral circulation
circulation carried on through secondary channels after obstruction of the principal channel supplying the part.
coronary circulation
that within the coronary vessels, which supply the muscle of the heart.
cutaneous circulation
cutaneous vessels are innervated by sympathetic adrenergic vasoconstrictor fibers; vasodilation is an important mechanism for losing heat after the body has been warmed.
enterohepatic circulation
the cycle in which bile salts and other substances excreted by the liver in the bile are absorbed by the intestinal mucosa and returned to the liver via the portal circulation.
extracorporeal circulation
circulation of blood outside the body, as through a hemodialyzer or an extracorporeal circulatory support unit.
fetal circulation
circulation of blood through the body of the fetus and to and from the placenta through the umbilical cord. See also fetal circulation.
hepatic circulation
includes the hepatic arterial blood supply and the supply from the portal vein; drainage is via the hepatic veins to the caudal vena cava.
lymph circulation
see lymph.
maternal circulation
the circulation of the dam during pregnancy, including especially that of the uterus.
micro-circulation
neonatal circulation
circulation in the newborn immediately after birth; the umbilical vessels contract forcing blood into the fetal veins; the foramen ovale closes, the ductus arteriosus narrows and eventually closes at day 1 to 2 after birth.
ocular circulation
consists of the uveal and retinal blood vessels supported by the aqueous humor and vitreous body.
placental circulation
consists of the umbilical arteries, the vessels of the placenta proper and the umbilical veins; approximates the fetal corporeal circulation in volume.
portal circulation
a general term denoting the circulation of blood through larger vessels from the capillaries of one organ to those of another; applied especially to the passage of blood from the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas and spleen through the portal vein to the liver.
pulmonary circulation
the flow of blood from the right ventricle through the pulmonary artery to the lungs, where carbon dioxide is exchanged for oxygen, and back through the pulmonary vein to the left atrium. See also pulmonary circulation.
splenic circulation
flow of blood through the splenic artery and arterioles to either the capillaries, e. g. white pulp, or the highly permeable sinuses of the red pulp. Splenic venous blood drains into the portal vein and passes through the liver before re-entering the general circulation.
systemic circulation
the flow of blood from the left ventricle through the aorta, carrying oxygen and nutrient material to all the tissues of the body, and returning through the superior and inferior venae cavae to the right atrium.
circulation time
the time required for blood to flow between two given points. It is determined by injecting a substance into a vein and then measuring the time required for it to reach a specific site.
References in periodicals archive ?
We performed a pilot study to understand whether puerarin undergoes an efficient enterohepatic circulation.
Nuclear hormone receptors may be affected in patients treated with agents that sequester BA or otherwise interrupt enterohepatic circulation.
It acts locally in the gut with minimal systemic exposure and modulates the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids by a partial inhibition of the Ileal Bile Acid Transporter (IBAT).
The toxicology and pharmacology literature also suggests that interindividual variations in gut microbiota may affect chemical metabolism via direct activation of chemicals, depletion of metabolites needed for biotransformation, alteration of host biotransformation enzyme activities, changes in enterohepatic circulation, altered bioavailability of environmental chemicals and/or antioxidants from food, and alterations in gut motility and barrier function.
Ezetimibe is conjugated to its active glucuronide form, which undergoes enterohepatic circulation.