enterocystoplasty

enterocystoplasty

 [en″ter-o-sis´to-plas″te]
the most common type of augmentation cystoplasty, using a portion of intestine for the graft. Common types include ileocystoplasty, ileocecocystoplasty, and sigmoid cystoplasty.

enterocystoplasty

/en·tero·cys·to·plas·ty/ (-sis´to-plas″te) the most common type of augmentation cystoplasty, using a portion of intestine for the graft.

enterocystoplasty

[en′terosis′toplas′te]
the most common type of augmentation cystoplasty, using a portion of intestine for the graft. Common types include ileocystoplasty, ileocecocystoplasty, and sigmoid cystoplasty.

enterocystoplasty

(ĕn″tĕr-ō-sĭs′tō-plăs″tē) [″ + ″ + plastos, formed]
A plastic surgical procedure involving the use of a portion of intestine to enlarge the bladder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ileal enterocystoplasty and B12 deficiency in pediatric patients.
The ureter's mucosal lining has the great advantage of being non-secretory and free from the metabolic complications of enterocystoplasty, such as acidosis.
Because the augmentation material contains no heterotopic tissue, the reported risk of late bladder neoplasia in enterocystoplasty must theoretically be decreased.
Currently, the treatment of choice in these patients is enterocystoplasty with the aim to increase bladder capacity and lower the storage pressure (1).
The most common surgical procedure currently used to treat patients with failing bladders is known as enterocystoplasty, a procedure that was developed more than 100 years ago that uses the patient's own bowel tissue to augment the failing bladder.
The most common procedure currently used is known as augmentation enterocystoplasty.
17] The authors concluded that conversion from an enterocystoplasty or continent urinary diversion to a urinary conduit utilizing the original bowel segment yielded acceptable patient outcomes in this population, with no intraoperative or early postoperative complications.
Clark is believed to be the first person in the world to have undergone what is known as "laparoscopic enterocystoplasty with catheterizable stoma.
This work provided the foundation for a landmark clinical trial that used autologous-engineered bladder tissue as an alternative for conventional enterocystoplasty.
We present 2 patients that underwent successful sacral neuromodulation after failed enterocystoplasty.