enteritis


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Related to enteritis: gastroenteritis, eosinophilic enteritis, bacterial enteritis

enteritis

 [en″tĕ-ri´tis]
inflammation of the intestine, especially the small intestine, a general condition that can be produced by a variety of causes. Bacteria and certain viruses may infect the intestinal tract and produce symptoms of abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Similar effects may result from poisonous foods such as mushrooms and berries, or from a harmful chemical present in food or drink. Enteritis may also be the consequence of overeating or alcoholic excesses.ƒ

Rest and bland diet are generally prescribed. In cases of bacterial infection antibiotics may be helpful. Severe dehydration, which may accompany enteritis, is treated with replacement of lost fluids and electrolytes. See also diarrhea; bowel elimination, altered; and deficient fluid volume.
membranous enteritis (mucomembranous enteritis) (mucous enteritis) mucous colitis.
enteritis necro´ticans an inflammation of the intestines due to Clostridium perfringens type F, characterized by necrosis.
phlegmonous enteritis a condition with symptoms resembling those of peritonitis, which may be secondary to other intestinal diseases, e.g., chronic obstruction, strangulated hernia, carcinoma.
enteritis polypo´sa enteritis marked by polypoid growths in the intestine, due to proliferation of the connective tissue.
regional enteritis Crohn's disease.

en·ter·i·tis

(en'tĕr-ī'tis),
Inflammation of the intestine, especially of the small intestine.
[entero- + G. -itis, inflammation]

enteritis

/en·ter·i·tis/ (en″ter-i´tis) inflammation of the intestine, especially of the small intestine.
regional enteritis  Crohn's disease.

enteritis

(ĕn′tə-rī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the intestinal tract, especially of the small intestine.

enteritis

[en′tərī′tis]
inflammation of the mucosal lining of the small intestine, resulting from a variety of causes-bacterial, viral, functional, and inflammatory. Involvement of both small and large intestines is called enterocolitis. Compare gastroenteritis.
enlarge picture
Fungal enteritis

enteritis

Inflammation of the small intestine

en·ter·i·tis

(en'tĕr-ī'tis)
Inflammation of the intestine, especially of the small intestine.
[entero- + G. -itis, inflammation]

enteritis

Inflammation of any part of the intestine from any cause. The enteritides include CROHN'S DISEASE, APPENDICITIS, ULCERATIVE COLITIS, bacillary dysentery (SHIGELLOSIS), AMOEBIC DYSENTERY and diverticulitis. See also GASTROENTERITIS.

enteritis,

n small intestine inflammation affecting the mucosal lining; may stem from viral, bacterial, inflam-matory, and functional causes.
Enlarge picture
Enteritis.

en·ter·i·tis

(en'tĕr-ī'tis)
Inflammation of the intestine.
[entero- + G. -itis, inflammation]

enteritis

(en´tərī´tis),
n an inflammation of the mucosal lining of the small intestine.

enteritis

inflammation of the intestinal mucosa resulting in clinical signs of diarrhea, sometimes dysentery, abdominal pain and dehydration and electrolyte loss and imbalance. In more severe cases there is much mucus in the feces and in the worst ones there are shreds or even sheets of exfoliated mucosa. Gastritis is commonly an accompanying lesion. Vomiting may be a concurrent sign in monogastric animals. The causes are many and include bacteria, viruses, chemicals, damaged feedstuffs and nematode parasites and protozoa. Descriptions of those diseases will be found under the headings of their causative agents, e.g. rotavirus, coronavirus, enterovirus, Salmonella. There is a further list of diseases in which diarrhea is the cardinal sign but in which there are no lesions of enteritis. These are the enteropathies. See also enteropathy.

canine viral enteritis
common causes in dogs are canine parvoviruses, coronavirus and rotavirus. Other viruses isolated from dogs with enteritis but of unknown clinical significance are astrovirus, calicivirus and parainfluenza virus.
equine chronic eosinophilic enteritis
part of a multisystemic epitheliotropic syndrome including pancreatitis and dermatitis.
feline enteritis
see feline panleukopenia.
granulomatous enteritis
horses with this disease continue to lose condition over a long period and most have diarrhea and edema. There is a hypoproteinemia and protein loss in the feces. In dogs, the changes are similar, but may be segmental and can be the cause of partial obstruction.
hemocytic enteritis
enteritis of shrimps associated with blooms of some blue-green algae.
lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis
infiltration of the lamina propria with lymphocytes and plasma cells can be a nonspecific response to chronic inflammation, but is classified by some as a primary, immune-mediated disease of the intestine causing malabsorption, chronic watery diarrhea and sometimes a protein-losing enteropathy.
mink enteritis
see mink enteritis.
necrotic enteritis
see necrotic enteritis.
parvoviral enteritis
canine parvovirus.
phlegmonous enteritis
a condition with clinical signs resembling those of peritonitis, which may be secondary to other intestinal diseases, e.g. chronic obstruction, strangulated hernia, carcinoma.
proximal enteritis
duodenitis.
regional enteritis
see terminal ileitis.
turkey coronaviral enteritis
acute, highly infectious disease of turkeys of all ages characterized by inappetence, wet droppings, weight loss and heavy mortality is caused by a coronavirus. Called also bluecomb disease.
turkey hemorrhagic enteritis
caused by an adenovirus this disease affects turkey poults over 4 weeks old and is characterized by bloody droppings and sudden death. An epidemic disease now very widespread.
ulcerative enteritis
an acute disease of chickens, poults and game birds caused by Clostridium colinum. It is characterized by rapid spread of an acute symptomless disease. Quail show watery white droppings. Lesions include hemorrhagic enteritis in acute cases with ulceration the major finding in subacute cases. The morbidity in quail may be 100%, in chickens it is nearer 10%. Called also quail disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on its known pharmacology, we believe that oral administration of BDP may help to prevent or reduce the severity of acute radiation enteritis and the deleterious effects it has on the patient's and treating physician's ability to deal with the underlying malignancy.
Our results highlight the need to apply molecular diagnostic tools widely to determine the actual etiology of acute childhood enteritis when the causative agent is not known.
DOR expects to begin a confirmatory Phase 3 clinical trial of orBec(R) for the treatment of acute GI GVHD and a Phase 1/2 clinical trial of DOR201 in radiation enteritis in the second half of 2009.
6[degrees]C, hemorrhagic enteritis, tenesmus, and deep sensorial depression.
In a poster presentation entitled, "Parenteral administration of velafermin (rhFGF-20) reduces radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in vivo," it was reported that the incidence of enteritis and diarrhea for animals treated with velafermin was reduced up to 50%.
This pathologic pattern differs greatly from TCoV enteritis in turkeys and makes GFCoV of potential interest for comparative studies of CoV pathobiology.
In the 1980s, Salmonella enteritis adapted in a way that made them able to cause ovarian infection in chickens," Muriana says.
Mink that tested positive for this new variant were from herds that had mink enteritis virus, hepatic lipidosis, Aleutian mink disease virus, and catarrhal enteritis, all factors that could explain the clinical and pathologic findings of the mink infected with HEV (15).
We remain committed to evaluating all strategic options while we continue the development of our oral BDP programs for pediatric Crohn's disease, acute radiation syndrome and acute radiation enteritis as well as the development of our vaccine programs including our novel thermostabilization technology, ThermoVax[TM].
Dr Alastair Forbes of digestive disorders charity Core said: "Gastrointestinal viruses are the commonest cause of gastro- enteritis in the UK.
EXPERTS at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine yesterday warned the main threat now to victims of the Asia earthquake disaster is the risk of contracting water-borne diseases such as dysentery, gastro enteritis, typhoid and cholera.
Evoclin is contraindicated in individuals with a history of hypersensitivity to preparations containing clindamycin or lincomycin, a history of regional enteritis or ulcerative colitis, or a history of antibiotic-associated colitis.