enteric-coated tablet


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tablet

 [tab´let]
a solid dosage form containing a medicinal substance with or without a suitable diluent. Called also pill.
buccal tablet one which dissolves when it is held between the cheek and gum, permitting direct absorption of the active ingredient through the oral mucosa.
enteric-coated tablet one coated with material that delays release of the medication until after it leaves the stomach.
sublingual tablet one that dissolves when held beneath the tongue, permitting direct absorption of the active ingredient by the oral mucosa.

en·ter·ic-coat·ed tab·let

(en-ter'ik kō'tĕd tab'lĕt)
A tablet covered with a substance that delays release of the medication until the tablet has passed through the stomach and into the intestine.

enteric-coated tablet

A tablet that resists digestion in gastric acid.
See also: tablet

tablet

a solid dosage form containing a medicinal substance with or without a suitable diluent.

enteric-coated tablet
one coated with material that delays release of the medication until after it leaves the stomach.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients receiving either 800 mg or 1000 mg once daily with the enteric-coated tablet formulation, and patients receiving 400 mg twice daily with the capsule formulation, experienced a 1.
Acidum acetylsalicylicum enteric-coated tablets 75 mg 30 tabl op.
Nine of the medicines, including Salbutamol, Compound Sulfamethoxazole Tablets, Nitrofurantoin Enteric-coated Tablets, Amidopyrine and Phenacetin Compound Tablets, Isatis Root Granules, Pulse-activating Decoction, Compound Salvia Tablets, Guanxinsuhe Capsules, and Antibiotic and Liver Cholaneresis Soothing Tablets, are Category A medicines.
In addition to the injectable Belerofon evaluated in this clinical study, Nautilus Biotech has formulated lyophilized Belerofon together with inactive ingredients to produce enteric-coated tablets for oral administration and filed an IND for oral Belerofon in February 2007.
The most common adverse reactions (incidence of 5% or greater) reported in RA clinical trials with sulfasalazine enteric-coated tablets were nausea, dyspepsia, rash, immunoglobulin suppression, headache, abdominal pain, vomiting and fever.
Azulfidine EN-tabs (sulfasalazine delayed release tablets, USP) enteric-coated tablets are for patients with rheumatoid arthritis who have responded inadequately to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
Aciphex will be available in 20 mg, enteric-coated tablets to be prescribed once daily.