enteric fever


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en·ter·ic fe·ver

1. Synonym(s): typhoid fever
2. the group of typhoid and paratyphoid fevers.

enteric fever

n.
Typhoid fever or paratyphoid fever.

enteric fever

enteric fever

A nonspecific term for typhoid and paratyphoid gastroenteritides which are accompanied by fever.

en·ter·ic fe·ver

(en-ter'ik fē'vĕr)
1. Synonym(s): typhoid fever.
2. The group of typhoid and paratyphoid fevers.

enteric fever

See TYPHOID.

Enteric fever

A term that is sometimes used for either typhoid or paratyphoid fever.
Mentioned in: Paratyphoid Fever

enteric

pertaining to the small intestine.

enteric bacteria
straight gram-negative rods, members of the family enterobacteriaceae.
enteric-coated
designating a special coating applied to tablets or capsules which prevents release and absorption of their contents until they reach the intestine.
enteric fever
enteric protein loss
see protein-losing enteropathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Children with Enteric fever associated with coinfections or those who are managed outside are excluded from the study.
Gallbladder perforation secondary to enteric fever requires a high index of clinical suspicion for diagnosis.
Enteric fever presenting as secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.
During the study period, 104 children were clinically diagnosed with enteric fever.
Serotype Paratyphi A is responsible for a growing proportion of enteric fever cases in many countries, accounting for as much as half of the cases (8).
Researchers suggest that a marshy area near the White House that was used for the disposal of human waste could have given rise to paratyphoid or enteric fever.
Blood samples were collected from patients with clinically suspected enteric fever and were sent to hospital laborator y for culture and sensitivit y(C/S).
Conclusion: Common Laboratory features of enteric fever include anemia, elevated liver enzymes and elevated ESR.
Typhoid (enteric) fever has been known since antiquity, but its clinical significance in paediatrics was only recognised in India in the early 19th century (1) Enteric fever is caused by infection with Salmonella typhi and to a lesser extent S.
Enteric fever is prevalent world over and continues to be a major public health problem in developing countries.
Ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella typhi may lead to a situation of untreatable enteric fever.