enteric adenovirus

enteric adenovirus

Virology A serotype–eg, type 40, 41–of adenovirus which produces gastroenteritis Clinical Diarrhea; keratoconjunctivitis and nasopharyngitis–typical of infection with other adenoviruses–do not occur Management Symptomatic with rehydration. See Gastroenteritis.
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Analysis for rotavirus, calicivirus, enteric adenovirus, and astrovirus was conducted (data not shown), and only samples negative for these viruses were selected.
Most important food- and waterborne viruses and the associated clinical syndrome (6) Likelihood of water- and foodborne transmission Gastroenteritis Hepatitis Other Common Norovirus Hepatitis A virus Uncommon Enteric adenovirus Hepatitis Enterovirus Rotavirus E virus Sapovirus Astrovirus Coronavirus Aichivirus
Escherichia coli O157:H7, Verocytotoxin-producing E coli), and four viruses (rotavirus, norovirus, enteric adenovirus, and astrovirus) that cause diarrhea.
Enteric adenovirus and astrovirus are important causes of gastroenteritis in children but have limited pathogenicity for adults.
We describe this novel rotavirus genotype, G14P[24], found along with enteric adenovirus in a stool sample from a child with diarrhea.
Human enteric adenovirus type 41 (Tak) contains a second fiber protein gene.
Other recognized viral causes of pediatric gastroenteritis include norovirus, astrovirus, enteric adenovirus (serotypes 40 and 41), and sapovirus (1).
Clinical course of illness in 10-month-old boy with systemic infection with enteric adenovirus and Haemophilus influenzae disease, Thailand, 2003-2004 * Date, 2003 Events Dec 7 Patient hospitalized with 6-day history of fever >38 [degrees]C and somnolence; blood culture positive for Hemophilus influenzae; isolate not typed (unavailable for further characterization) Dec 9 CSF results: pleocytosis (2,710 leukocytes/ [mm.
In addition, samples were screened for enteric adenovirus, astrovirus, norovirus, and human bocavirus by PCR (6,7).
coli were found in 42 (31%) of these children, followed by enteric adenovirus (10%), Salmonella sp.
The major agents include rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus, astrovirus, and enteric adenovirus.
Stool samples of patients <2 years of age were also evaluated for rotavirus and enteric adenovirus since viral diarrhea is mainly seen in young children.