enophthalmos


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Related to enophthalmos: Pancoast tumor, Horner syndrome, Anophthalmos

enophthalmos

 [en″of-thal´mos]
a backward displacement of the eyeball into the orbit.

en·oph·thal·mos

(en'of-thal'mos),
Recession of the eyeball within the orbit.
Synonym(s): enophthalmia
[G. en, in, + ophthalmos, eye]

enophthalmos

[en′əfthal′məs]
Etymology: Gk, en, in, ophthalmos, eye
backward displacement of the eye in the bony socket, caused by traumatic injury or developmental defect. Ptosis may cause an incorrect diagnosis of enophthalmos. enophthalmic, adj.

en·oph·thal·mos

(en'of-thal'mos)
Recession of the eyeball within the orbit.
[G. en, in, + ophthalmos, eye]

enophthalmos

A sinking backwards of the eyeball into its bony socket so that the lid margins cannot easily be held the normal distance apart and there is an obvious narrowing of the lid aperture. Enophthalmos is the opposite of EXOPHTHALMOS. Enophthalmos results from loss of fat within the eye socket.

Enophthalmos

A condition in which the eye falls back into the socket and inhibits proper eyelid function.
Mentioned in: Tarsorrhaphy

enophthalmos

Recession of the eyeball into the orbit. It is caused by a degeneration and shrinking of the orbital fat, a tumour, an injury to the orbit or to shortening of the extraocular muscles following excessive resections. See entropion; exophthalmometer.

enophthalmos

a backward displacement of the eyeball into the orbit.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the classic description of SSS includes enophthalmos, cases with lateralized uncinate processes and increased orbital volumes on CT scans, but without clinical enophthalmos, have been reported.
Mucocele of the maxillary sinus causing enophthalmos.
Three orbital tumor cases where the Sonopet was used Variable Case 1: Orbital Case 2: Greater apex meningioma sphenoid wing fibrous dysplasia Critical tissue spared by Sonopet Oculomotor nerve Lateral rectus Additional operative time None None Preoperative exophthalmos Present Present Postoperative exophthalmos None None Preoperative keratopathy Present Present Postoperative keratopathy None None Variable Case 3: Infiltrative mass Critical tissue spared by Sonopet None Additional operative time None Preoperative exophthalmos Enophthalmos present Postoperative exophthalmos None Preoperative keratopathy None Postoperative keratopathy None
Over time, the delayed enophthalmos became more apparent.
To offset the overall increase in orbital volume, which had led to the enophthalmos, an orbital implant was fashioned from 1-mm silicone sheeting (Invotec International; Jacksonville, Fla.
External excisions were avoided, and the risk of enophthalmos, ectropion, and entropion was theoretically lessened.
Spontaneous unilateral enophthalmos with asymptomatic sinus disease was first described by Montgomery in 1964.
enophthalmos and associated inflammatory disease), the condition is called chronic maxillary atelectasis.
Physical examination revealed well-healed facial scars, right-sided enophthalmos, and limitation of the superior gaze.
When the lateral orbital wall is fractured at the zygomaticosphenoid suture, problems--including increased orbital volume with enophthalmos or extraocular muscle entrapment--may ensue and lead to diplopia.
Enophthalmos caused by inadequate maxillary sinus function was first reported in 1964.
The silent sinus syndrome is an example of this phenomenon, characterized by an absence of symptoms and the development of enophthalmos.