tissue

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tissue

 [tish´u]
a group or layer of similarly specialized cells that together perform certain special functions.
adenoid tissue lymphoid tissue.
adipose tissue connective tissue made of fat cells in a meshwork of areolar tissue.
areolar tissue connective tissue made up largely of interlacing fibers.
bony tissue osseous tissue.
brown adipose tissue (brown fat tissue) brown fat.
bursa-equivalent tissue (bursal equivalent tissue) a hypothesized lymphoid tissue in nonavian vertebrates including human beings, equivalent to the bursa of Fabricius in birds: the site of B lymphocyte maturation. It now appears that B lymphocyte maturation occurs primarily in the bone marrow.
cancellous tissue the spongy tissue of bone.
cartilaginous tissue the substance of cartilage.
chordal tissue the tissue of the notochord.
chromaffin tissue a tissue composed largely of chromaffin cells, well supplied with nerves and vessels; it occurs in the adrenal medulla and also forms the paraganglia of the body.
cicatricial tissue the dense fibrous tissue forming a cicatrix, derived directly from granulation tissue; called also scar tissue.
connective tissue the tissue that binds together and is the support of the various structures of the body; see also connective tissue.
elastic tissue connective tissue made up of yellow elastic fibers, frequently massed into sheets.
endothelial tissue peculiar connective tissue lining serous and lymph spaces.
epithelial tissue a general name for tissues not derived from the mesoderm.
erectile tissue spongy tissue that expands and becomes hard when filled with blood.
fatty tissue connective tissue made of fat cells in a meshwork of areolar tissue.
fibrous tissue the common connective tissue of the body, composed of yellow or white parallel elastic and collagen fibers.
gelatinous tissue mucous tissue.
granulation tissue material formed in repair of wounds of soft tissue, consisting of connective tissue cells and ingrowing young vessels; it ultimately forms cicatrix.
gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) lymphoid tissue associated with the gut, including the tonsils, Peyer's patches, lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract, and appendix.
indifferent tissue undifferentiated embryonic tissue.
interstitial tissue connective tissue between the cellular elements of a structure.
lymphadenoid tissue tissue resembling that of lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, tonsils, and lymph vessels.
lymphoid tissue a latticework of reticular tissue whose interspaces contain lymphocytes.
mesenchymal tissue embryonic connective tissue composed of stellate cells and a ground substance of coagulable fluid.
mucous tissue a jellylike connective tissue, such as occurs in the umbilical cord. Called also gelatinous tissue.
muscular tissue the substance of muscle.
myeloid tissue red bone marrow.
nerve tissue (nervous tissue) the specialized tissue forming the elements of the nervous system.
osseous tissue the specialized tissue forming the bones.
reticular tissue (reticulated tissue) connective tissue composed predominantly of reticulum cells and reticular fibers.
scar tissue cicatricial tissue.
sclerous t's the cartilaginous, fibrous, and osseous tissues.
skeletal tissue the bony, ligamentous, fibrous, and cartilaginous tissue forming the skeleton and its attachments.
splenic tissue red pulp.
subcutaneous tissue the layer of loose connective tissue directly under the skin.
tissue typing identification of tissue types for purposes of predicting acceptance or rejection of grafts and transplants. The process and purposes of tissue typing are essentially the same as for blood typing. The major difference lies in the kinds of antigens being evaluated. The acceptance of allografts depends on the hla antigens (HLA); if the donor and recipient are not HLA identical, the allograft is rejected, sometimes within minutes. The HLA genes are located in the major histocompatibility complex, a region on the short arm of chromosome 6, and are involved in cell-cell interaction, immune response, organ transplantation, development of cancer, and susceptibility to disease. There are five genetic loci, designated HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-D, and HLA-DR. At each locus, there can be any of several different alleles.



Each person inherits one chromosome 6 from the mother and one from the father; that is, each parent transmits to the child one allele for each kind of antigen (A, B, C, D, and DR). If the parents are different at both alleles of a locus, the statistical chance of one sibling being identical to another is one in four (25 per cent), the chance of being identical at one allele only (half-identical) is 50 per cent, and the chance of a total mismatch is 25 per cent.
Techniques for Tissue Typing. Histocompatibility testing involves several basic methods of assay for HLA differences. The most widely used method uses the polymerase chain reaction to compare the DNA of the person, organ, or graft being tested with known pieces of the genes encoding MHC antigens. The variability of these regions of the genes determines the tissue type of the subject.



Serologic methods are used to detect serologically defined antigens on the surfaces of cells. In general, HLA-A, -B, and -C determinants are primarily measured by serologic techniques. A second method, involving lymphocyte reactivity in a mixed lymphocyte culture, for determining HLA-D or lymphocyte-defined antigens, is now only rarely used.

Essentially, the serologic method is performed by incubating target lymphocytes (isolated from fresh peripheral blood) with antisera that recognize all known HLA antigens. The cells are spread in a tray with microscopic wells containing various kinds of antisera and are incubated for 30 minutes, followed by an additional 60-minute complement incubation. If the lymphocytes have on their surfaces antigens recognized by the antibodies in the antiserum, the lymphocytes are lysed. A dye is added to show changes in the permeability of the cell membrane and cellular death. The proportion of cells destroyed by lysis indicates the degree of histologic incompatibility. If, for example, the lymphocytes from a person being tested for HLA-A3 are destroyed in a well containing antisera for HLA-A3, the test is positive for this antigen group.
white adipose tissue (yellow adipose tissue) the adipose tissue composing the bulk of the body fat.

tis·sue

(tish'yū),
A collection of similar cells and the intercellular substances surrounding them. There are four basic kinds of tissue in the body: epithelium; connective tissues including adipose tissue, blood, bone, and cartilage; muscle tissue; and nerve tissue.
[Fr. tissu, woven, fr. L. texo, to weave]

tissue

/tis·sue/ (tish´u) an aggregation of similarly specialized cells which together perform certain special functions.
adenoid tissue  lymphoid t.
adipose tissue  connective tissue made of fat cells in meshwork of areolar tissue.
areolar tissue  connective tissue made up largely of interlacing fibers.
bony tissue  bone.
brown adipose tissue  a thermogenic type of adipose tissue containing a dark pigment, and arising during embryonic life in certain specific areas in many mammals, including humans; it is prominent in the newborn.
cancellous tissue  the spongy tissue of bone.
cartilaginous tissue  the substance of cartilage.
chromaffin tissue  a tissue composed largely of chromaffin cells, well supplied with nerves and vessels; it occurs in the adrenal medulla and also forms the paraganglia of the body.
cicatricial tissue  the dense fibrous tissue forming a cicatrix, derived directly from granulation tissue.
connective tissue  the stromatous or nonparenchymatous tissues of the body; that which binds together and is the ground substance of the various parts and organs of the body.
elastic tissue , elastic tissue, yellow connective tissue made up of yellow elastic fibers, frequently massed into sheets.
endothelial tissue  endothelium.
epithelial tissue  epithelium.
erectile tissue  spongy tissue that expands and becomes hard when filled with blood.
extracellular tissue  the total of tissues and body fluids outside the cells.
fatty tissue  adipose t.
fibrous tissue  the common connective tissue of the body, composed of yellow or white parallel fibers.
gelatinous tissue  mucous t.
glandular tissue  an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions.
granulation tissue  the newly formed vascular tissue normally produced in healing of wounds of soft tissue, ultimately forming the cicatrix.
gut-associated lymphoid tissue  (GALT) lymphoid tissue associated with the gut, including the tonsils, Peyer's patches, lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract, and appendix.
indifferent tissue  undifferentiated embryonic tissue.
interstitial tissue  connective tissue between the cellular elements of a structure.
lymphadenoid tissue  tissue resembling that of lymph nodes, found in the spleen, bone marrow, tonsils, and other organs.
lymphoid tissue  a latticework of reticular tissue, the interspaces of which contain lymphocytes.
mesenchymal tissue  mesenchyme.
mucous tissue  a jellylike connective tissue, as occurs in the umbilical cord.
muscle tissue , muscular tissue the substance of muscle, consisting of muscle fibers, muscle cells, connective tissue, and extracellular material.
myeloid tissue  red bone marrow.
nerve tissue , nervous tissue the specialized tissue making up the central and peripheral nervous systems, consisting of neurons with their processes, other specialized or supporting cells, and extracellular material.
osseous tissue  the specialized tissue forming the bones.
reticular tissue , reticulated tissue connective tissue consisting of reticular cells and fibers.
scar tissue  cicatricial t.
sclerous tissues  the cartilaginous, fibrous, and osseous tissue.
skeletal tissue  the bony, ligamentous, fibrous, and cartilaginous tissue forming the skeleton and its attachments.
subcutaneous tissue  the layer of loose connective tissue directly under the skin.
white adipose tissue , yellow adipose tissue the adipose tissue comprising the bulk of the body fat.

tissue

(tĭsh′o͞o, -yo͞o)
n.
Biology An aggregation of morphologically similar cells and associated intercellular matter acting together to perform one or more specific functions in an organism. There are four basic types of tissue in many animals: muscle, nerve, epidermal, and connective.

tis′su·ey adj.
tis′su·lar adj.

tissue

[tish′o̅o̅]
Etymology: Fr, tissu, fabric
a collection of similar cells in a matrix acting together to perform a particular function.

tissue

Medspeak-UK
Any constituent part of the human body formed by cells, which includes a whole or part of a whole organs, organ samples of any size, and blood.
 
Pathology
A generic term for any solid part of the body which can be examined histologically after submitting it to the usual processing methods—fixation, embedding in a wax (paraffin), sectioning on a microtome, and staining with dyes (typically haematoxylin and eosin).

tissue

A group of similar cells and stroma, which perform a specific function. See Adipose tissue, Bronchiole-associated lymphoid tissue, Chromaffin tissue, Connective tissue, Granulation tissue, Gut-associated lymphoid tissue, Mucosa-related lymphoid tissue, Skin-associated lymphoid tissue, Soft tissue.

tis·sue

(tish'ū)
An aggregation of similar cells or types of cells, together with any associated intercellular materials, adapted to perform one or more specific functions. There are four basic tissues in the body: 1) epithelium; 2) connective tissue, including blood, bone, and cartilage; 3) muscle; and 4) nerve.
[Fr. tissu, woven, fr. L. texo, to weave]

tissue

(tish'oo) [Fr. tissu, from L. texere, to weave]
A group or collection of similar cells and their intercellular substance that perform a particular function. The four major groups are epithelial, connective, muscular, and nervous tissues.

adipose tissue

Fat.

areolar tissue

A form of loose connective tissue consisting of fibroblasts in a matrix of tissue fluid and collagen and elastin fibers. Many white blood cells are present. It is found subcutaneously and beneath the epithelium of all mucous membranes. See: connective tissue for illus
Enlarge picture
BONE TISSUE

bone tissue

Osseous tissue.illustration

bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue

Abbreviation: BALT
Lymph nodules that contain clusters of T and B lymphocytes and macrophages within the mucosa of the bronchial wall; a component of the mucosal immune system that defends all mucosal surfaces against pathogens.
See: mucosal immune system

brown adipose tissue

Abbreviation: BAT
Brown fat..

cancellous tissue

Spongy bone with many marrow cavities. It is present at the ends of long bones and in the interior of most flat bones.

chondroid tissue

Embryonic cartilage.

chordal tissue

Tissue of the notochord or derived from it. The nucleus pulposus is derived from the notochord.

chromaffin tissue

Chromaffin system.

cicatricial tissue

Scar.
Enlarge picture
CONNECTIVE TISSUES

connective tissue

Tissue that supports and connects other tissues and parts of the body. Connective tissue has comparatively few cells. Its bulk consists of intercellular substance or matrix, whose nature gives each type of connective tissue its particular properties. The vascular supply varies: cartilage, none; fibrous, poor; adipose, good; and bone, abundant. Connective tissue includes the following types: areolar, adipose, fibrous, elastic, reticular, cartilage, and bone. Blood may also be considered a connective tissue.
illustration

elastic tissue

A form of connective tissue in which yellow elastic fibers predominate. It is found in certain ligaments, the walls of blood vessels, esp. the larger arteries, and around the alveoli of the lungs.

embryonic tissue

Any tissue that arises from the fertilization of an ovum and has not become differentiated or specialized.

endothelial tissue

Endothelium.

epithelial tissue

Epithelium.

erectile tissue

Spongy tissue, the spaces of which fill with blood, causing it to harden and expand. It is found in the penis, clitoris, and nipples.

fatty tissue

Fat.

fibrous tissue

Connective tissue consisting principally of collagen fibers. Also called white fibrous or dense connective tissue; may be regular (parallel fibers) or irregular.

gelatiginous tissue

Tissue from which gelatin may be obtained by treating it with hot water.

glandular tissue

A group of epithelial cells capable of producing secretions.

granulation tissue

The newly formed vascular and connective tissue produced in the early stages of wound healing.

hard tissue

In dentistry, the term used to denote any of the three calcified tissue components of the tooth: enamel, dentin, and cementum.

homologous tissues

Tissues that are identical in structure.

indifferent tissue

Tissue composed of undifferentiated cells as in embryonic tissue.

interstitial tissue

Connective tissue that forms a network with the cellular portions of an organ.

lymphadenoid tissue

Aggregates of lymphatic tissue found in the spleen and lymph nodes.

lymphoid tissue

Collections of lymphocytes in all stages of development found in the spleen, thymus, lymph nodes, lymph nodules of the digestive tract (tonsils, Peyer's patches), and the respiratory, urinary, and reproductive tracts.

mesenchymal tissue

The embryonic mesenchyme.

mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue

Abbreviation: MALT
Aggregates of T and B lymphocytes found in all mucous membranes, a line of defense against infection. Examples include Peyer's patches in the small intestine and lymph nodules in the colon, trachea, and bronchi. MALT contains CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and activated B cells and may occasionally undergo malignant transformation into lymphomas.
See: mucosal immune system

mucous tissue

The jellylike connective tissue of the umbilical cord.

muscular tissue

Muscle.

myeloid tissue

The bone marrow in which most blood cells are formed.

nerve tissue

The neurons and neuroglia of the nervous system.
See: neuron

osseous tissue

Bone, a connective tissue with a matrix of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate surrounding osteocytes
Synonym: bone tissue See: bone

reticular tissue

A type of connective tissue consisting of delicate fibers forming interlacing networks. Fibers stain selectively with silver stains and are called argyrophil fibers. Reticular tissue supports blood cells in lymph nodes, bone marrow, and the spleen.

scar tissue

Scar.

sclerous tissue

Firm connective tissue such as bone and cartilage.

skeletal tissue

Bone.

soft tissue

Any noncalcified tissue in the body. This term is especially used in relation to muscles, tendons, ligaments, skin, fat, and other connective tissues that are occasionally the source of pain when they are injured. Unlike bones or joints, which can be fractured or dislocated, soft tissues are bruised or inflamed by trauma. In surgery, soft tissues are dissected. By contrast, components of the (hard) bony skeleton are sawed, chiselled, or drilled. Soft tissues include all types of tissue except bone, i.e., all epithelial, muscle, and nerve tissue, as well as connective tissue excluding bone.

splenic tissue

The highly vascular splenic pulp.

subcutaneous tissue

Superficial fascia.

tissue

Any aggregation of joined cells and their connections that perform a particular function. Body tissues include bone, muscle, nerve tissue, nerve supporting glial tissue, epithelium, fat, fibrous and elastic tissue.

tissue

any group of cells of similar structure in animals or plants, that performs a specific function; examples are MUSCLE, PHLOEM.

tissue

collection of similar cells and surrounding intercellular substance; of four basic tissue types - epithelial (epithelium), connective, muscle and nerve

tissue

A basic anatomical and physiological component of the living organism, consisting of a collection of similar cells and their intercellular substances. Examples: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscular tissue, nervous tissue.

tis·sue

(tish'ū)
A collection of similar cells and intercellular substances surrounding them. Four basic kinds exist: epithelium; connective tissues including adipose tissue, blood, bone, and cartilage; muscle tissue; and nerve tissue.
[Fr. tissu, woven, fr. L. texo, to weave]

tissue (tish´oo),

n an aggregation of similarly specialized cells united in the performance of a particular function.
tissue adhesives,
n agents or materials that may be used to seal two cut tissue surfaces together or cover a surgically exposed surface such as butyl cyanoacrylate, which is used to cover palatal donor sites in periodontal surgery.
tissue, compression of,
n See tissue displaceability.
tissue conditioning,
n a disciplined program of patient-performed plaque control measures designed for gingiva that is soft, spongy, and bleeds easily from poor oral hygiene habits, in order to improve gingival health before subgingival scaling is performed.
tissue, connective,
n the binding and supportive tissue of the body; derived from the mesoderm; depending on its location and function, it is composed of fibroblasts, primitive mesenchymal cells, collagen fibers, and elastic fibers, with associated blood and lymphatic vessels and nerve fibers.
tissue, critical,
n tissue that reacts most unfavorably to radiation or by its nature attracts and absorbs specific radiochemicals.
tissue displaceability,
n the quality of oral tissues that permits them to be placed in or assume other positions than their relaxed position.
tissue displacement,
n change in the form or position of tissues as a result of pressure.
tissue, engineering,
n the interdisciplinary field that uses life science and engineering principles in the development of biologic substitutes for tissue restoration or replacement.
tissue, flabby,
n See tissue, hyperplastic.
tissue, hyperplastic,
n in dentistry, excessively movable tissue about the mandible or maxillae resulting from increases in the number of normal cells.
tissue, interdental,
n the gingivae, cementum of the teeth, free gingival and transseptal fibers of the periodontal membrane (ligament), and alveolar and supporting bone.
tissue molding,
tissue, peripheral,
tissue, redundant,
tissue sloughing,
n a surface layer of flesh peeling away. Possible causes are extensive exposure to topical anesthetic, overly abrasive toothpaste, smokeless tobacco, tissue burn, or mouthrinses. Also called
epithelial desquamation.
tissue, subjacent,
n the structures that underlie or are in border contact with a denture base; they may or may not have a supporting relationship to the overlying base.
tissue-borne partial denture,

tissue

a group or layer of similarly specialized cells that together perform certain special functions. For anatomically specific tissues see under their identifying titles, e.g. adipose, connective.

tissue death
tissue density
the penetrability of tissue by x-rays, bone and tooth being most dense, blood and soft tissue the next, fat the next, and gas and air least.
tissue edema
an abnormal accumulation of tissue fluid.
tissue factor
see tissue thromboplastin.
tissue fluid
the extracellular fluid that constitutes the environment of the body cells. It is low in protein, is formed by filtration through the capillaries, and the excess drains away as lymph. See also interstitial fluid.
tissue inhibitors
inhibitors of fibrinolysis; present in placenta.
indifferent tissue
undifferentiated embryonic tissue.
tissue necrosis fever
fever caused by pyrogens released by necrotic pyrogens.
tissue plasminogen activator
see plasminogen activator.
tissue reacting agent
substances that have a poorly defined but advantageous local effect on tissues.
tissue receptor site
a cell receptor common to cells of a particular tissue.
tissue residue
residues of chemical substances that are unacceptable to local pure food legislation especially sulfonamides, estrogens, chlorinated hydrocarbons, heavy metals. These are thought or known to have a deleterious effect on people eating or drinking the relevant animal product. See also chemical food residue.
tissue sensitivity
the susceptibility of individual tissues to injury by x-ray. The injury may be by way of inflammation, necrosis or cessation of cell growth. Fast-growing tissues in which the cells have a high mitotic index are the most sensitive, especially gonads, germinative layer of skin and erythropoietic tissues.
supportive t's
cartilage and bone.
tissue therapy
tissue typing
identification of tissue types for purposes of predicting acceptance or rejection of grafts and organ transplants. The process and purposes of tissue typing are essentially the same as for blood typing. The major difference lies in the kinds of antigens being evaluated. White blood cells, particularly lymphocytes, are used for tissue typing. The acceptance of allografts depends particularly on the matching of MHC antigens. If the donor and recipient are not MHC identical, the allograft is rejected. See also typing.

Patient discussion about tissue

Q. I could feel hard tissues in my breasts.I suspect it the other way, any idea what it may be? I could feel hard tissues in my breasts. While reading article about breast cancer, I happened to note that these may be simple cyst and there is nothing to worry. My friend too had cyst and treated by the doctor with needle by removing the fluid out. But I suspect it the other way, any idea what it may be?

A. you cannot just guess it, I do encourage you to go see your doctor (oncologist is recommended), to have your breast checked.
first, your doctor will have a physical examination on you, and then it might help to find the correct diagnose by using some imaging procedures (ultrasound, mammography), or even by doing a fine needle aspiration on the lump. then it will be checked under microscopes to get the specific "what is that lump?"

Q. I want to get cure for asthma and develop my cardiac tissue. What is the best exercise for me to do? This is Daron, 20/m. I have had asthma since I was 3 yrs old, and suffer from exercise induced asthma as well as weather and food. Running is the worst thing that induces asthma in me. I want to get cure for asthma and develop my cardiac tissue to ensure fitness. What is the best exercise for me to do? I will be very thankful if I get suitable suggestion or advice..

A. daron,their is no cure for asthma--asthma is controlled by meds--if you dont have one get a pulmonary DR.--you can try riding a bike,and walking,i was born with asthma and i have the same problem as you,--you can try walking or biking for a little amount of time each day,--you can also try taking your meds before doing any exercize,THere are meds on the market,that can help you to do the things that you like.--mrfoot56---peace

Q. I developed an AV Fistula after a heart catherization procedure. I am bleeding through the tissues in left arm I am on coumadin, but currently have a lower than usual INR. Corrective surgery was scheduled for yesterday, but had to be delayed. I am concerned that I have a large amount of blood (dark red) bleeding though the tissues right under the skin in my left arm. Should I seek immediate medical attention? The bleeding is over approximately a 3 and 1/2" area on my left arm. Came about in a period of a few minutes.

A. well, you are on blood thinners. i wouldn't take the chance. i mean- i'm not sure i follow what is happening over there. it could be a severe problem or nothing. i would let a doctor check it out. the worse thing that could happen is you wasting a day at the hospital, on the other end of that scenario- you can end up dead. i would go with the first one.

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