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A device for converting energy into mechanical motion.

dental engine

A machine that rotates dental instruments.

high-speed engine

A machine that rotates a dental instrument in excess of 12,000 rpm.

ultraspeed engine

A machine that rotates a dental instrument at speeds from 100,000 to 300,000 rpm.
References in classic literature ?
The engine came to a pause in its vicinity, with the usual tremendous shriek.
The engine now announced the close vicinity of the final station-house by one last and horrible scream, in which there seemed to be distinguishable every kind of wailing and woe, and bitter fierceness of wrath, all mixed up with the wild laughter of a devil or a madman.
The prince's subjects are now pretty numerously employed about the station-house, some in taking care of the baggage, others in collecting fuel, feeding the engines, and such congenial occupations; and I can conscientiously affirm that persons more attentive to their business, more willing to accommodate, or more generally agreeable to the passengers, are not to be found on any railroad.
And I suppose Seth was busy running the engine," Mrs.
She'd never opened her mouth once, and no sooner'd the engine stopped than she'd jumped to the ground and was gone.
He perceived some difference on the Vaterland for which he could not account, and then he realised that the engines had slowed to an almost inaudible beat.
The Americans being steam-turbine ships, had from two to four blast funnels each; the Germans lay lower in the water, having explosive engines, which now for some reason made an unwonted mu tering roar.
With the subsistence of the sea, we were able to go to work upon the damaged engines to some effect, and I also set men to examining the gravitation-screen generators with a view to putting them in working order should it prove not beyond our resources.
For two weeks we labored at the engines, which indisputably showed evidence of having been tampered with.
The furnaces roared, and the powerful engines whizzed and clanked, like a great metallic heart.
Rout had gone away, and Captain MacWhirr could feel against his ear the pulsation of the engines, like the beat of the ship's heart.
The wood-encased bulk of the low-pressure cylinder, frowning portly from above, emitted a faint wheeze at every thrust, and except for that low hiss the engines worked their steel limbs headlong or slow with a silent, determined smoothness.