enfranchisement


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enfranchisement

(en-fran?chiz'ment) [Fr. enfranchir, to free]
A recognized freedom to participate fully in society, such as the right to citizenship and the right to vote.
See: disenfranchisement
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References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that more than half of the women applying for enfranchisement were confined to domestic labour is unsurprising, given how common this occupation remained, especially for working-class, immigrant, and racialized women.
In that context, I look at not only in its provisions about reserve lands (affected by both the enfranchisement scheme of yore and modern day proposals for fee simple interests in reserve land), but also the definition of who is an "Indian" under the Act, which has served the colonizer's goal of reducing the Indian population.
10) However it took almost one century to the full enfranchisement of women and the arguments for suffrage were accompanied by nationalistic arguments.
Added to all of that is the fact that Egyptian expatriates are far from deciding on a strategy: push seriously for enfranchisement, work on influencing policies toward Egypt in their new home countries, raise money for the causes?
Taking the enfranchisement theme even a step further the report goes on to say "the only other possible remedy would be for Native communities to voluntarily surrender their Aboriginal title, but this requires a full community vote.
But it is a splendidly democratic melting pot now and the great enfranchisement has been of the major towns and cities, which means that as many urban racegoers as country ones will be there on Saturday.
Within the growing property law department, Katy works on commercial property transactions, leases, leasehold enfranchisement applications, property litigation and conveyancing.
The book is enhanced by almost forty maps, covering a wide range of subjects such as religion, urbanization, languages, population distribution, enfranchisement of women, child mortality, volcanic activity and world conflicts.
Enfranchisement merely mystifies power: "the voice of the people is always, in the culture of representational politics, a fiction, a fabrication" (156).
That may increase the enfranchisement of those "winners," but it disenfranchises everyone else, since all federal handouts are paid for by others.
For such a person, all our progressive talk about wider enfranchisement must be somewhat irritating, especially if it has effectively reduced his/her status by promoting a colleague but without directly replacing them.