enflurane


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enflurane

 [en´floo-rān]
a potent inhalational anesthetic, widely used for induction and maintenance of general anesthesia. It is nonflammable, induction and recovery are smooth and rapid, and the depth of anesthesia is rapidly altered. The incidence of arrhythmias and postoperative nausea and vomiting are somewhat less than with halothane or methoxyflurane. It is also used in low concentrations to provide analgesia during labor or painful procedures.

enflurane

/en·flu·rane/ (en´floo-rān) a potent inhalational anesthetic used for induction and maintenance of general anesthesia and for analgesia during labor and painful procedures.

enflurane

[en′floo͡rān]
a halogenated volatile liquid; a nonflammable anesthetic gas of the ether family. Its use has almost entirely been supplanted by newer, shorter-acting agents.

enflurane

(en´flŏŏrān),
n a nonflammable anesthetic gas belonging to the ether family, used for induction and maintenance of general anesthesia.

enflurane

a fluorinated ether, similar in action to halothane, used for general inhalation anesthesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Airway irritation produced by volatile anaesthetics during brief inhalation: comparison of halothane, enflurane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane.
The knockin animals, however, remained sensitive to the inhaled anesthetic enflurane.
emptied and (2) the potential for the delivery of a high concentration of halothane; the isoflurane vaporizer will deliver up to a concentration of 5%, and the enflurane vaporizer will deliver up to 7% enflurane, which is roughly 10% to 11% halothane when the difference in vapor pressures is considered.
Nitrous oxide was used to maintain anaesthesia and this was supplemented with volatile anaesthetics, such as isoflurane or enflurane, or with opioids in both types of study.
The instrument is unique in its ability to monitor seven gases simultaneously: nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane.
MH most often occurs in the operating room and is triggered by certain inhaled anesthetics (halothane, enflurane, or isoflurane) or by a short-acting muscle relaxant, succinyl-choline, which is given for the insertion of the breathing tube.
Certain inhalation anesthetics, particularly enflurane and isoflurane, antibiotics, magnesium salts, lithium, local anesthetics, procainamide and quinidine, have been shown to increase the duration of neuromuscular block and decrease infusion requirements of neuromuscular blocking agents.
Epinephrine-induced arrhythmias during enflurane anaesthesia in man: a nonlinear dose-response relationship and dose-dependent protection from lidocaine.
It has been observed that succinylcholine increases the biochemical markers of muscle damage when administered during halothane or enflurane anaesthesia.