enervation


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enervation

 [en″er-va´shun]
1. lack of nervous energy.
2. removal of a nerve or a section of a nerve.

enervation

/en·er·va·tion/ (en″er-va´shun)
1. lack of nervous energy.

enervation

[en′ərvā′shən]
Etymology: L, enervare, to weaken
1 reduction or lack of nervous energy; weakness; lassitude; languor.
2 removal of a complete nerve or a section of nerve.

en·er·va·tion

(en'ĕr-vā'shŭn)
Failure of nerve force; weakening.
[L. enervo, pp. -atus, to enervate, fr. e- priv. + nervus, nerve]

enervation

loss of nerve supply

enervation

1. lack of nervous energy.
2. removal of a nerve or a section of a nerve.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This thematics of enervation belies the canonical tradition of reading Giorgio as Nietzschean Ubermensch in Trionfo delia morte.
Alzheimer's disease is characterized by brain atrophy and presence of neurofibrillary tangles, granulovascular changes, neuritic granulovascular changes, neuritic (senile) plaques and reduced cholinergic enervation.
Added to these are moral factors: the corruptive influence of autocratic power (Caligula, Nero, and their ilk), the corrosive effects of sensualism (private orgies and seductive spas), the dehumanizing effects of institutionalized slavery, the disappearance of former virtues (chiefly self-reliance and self-sacrifice), and the enervation and distraction induced by Christianity's emphasis on brotherly love and otherworldly hope.
Entries include information about enervation, origin, insertion site, position, electrode insertion, pitfalls and the aforesaid comments.
Nor were the Effects of this distress less Surprising: Faintings in the lowest, & enervation in the Higher, and the highest were so intirely unbraced that you would have thought there bones all broken, or rather that they had no bones; so much as to this Extraordinary thing as it offer'd to the Sences.
This turf reconfiguration will likely come about due to looming technologic advances, including genomic screening for susceptibility to sudden cardiac death, noninvasive mapping of the heart to pinpoint the site of ventricular tachycardia or accessory pathways, noninvasive autonomic imaging of sympathetic enervation of the heart, and vagal imaging of the ventricle.
The heart is enervated, and it is this enervation that allows for the fight or flight response, involving adrenalin release and increased heart rate, that humans have when they perceive an immediate threat.
Enervation is a familiar topic for Lowell, the result of his exhausting manic-depressive cycles, as well as of his sustaining but contentious marriage to the writer and critic Elizabeth Hardwick, which is neatly sketched in these lines:
In the closing pages the prose line dramatically stirs, expands as Moody captures the possibility of spring-resurrection with sentences that suddenly experiment with imbedded constructions, create emphasis by varying length, shake up the prose line with sinewy catalogs that bust around punctuation and suggest a revival from enervation.
Wheeler, with a sense of anticipation and enervation, reported that "everything is going well but there is endless work for 'Ulster Day'.
This enervation of romance affects the negotiations over Rosicles/prince Charles' marriage.
Almost by definition, such a concentration implies the centripetal force that is the city: a focused appropriation of regional production for the consumption of the urban elite, a determined enervation of political voice so the sys tem is not challenged, and a subtle habituation of religious and cultural perception, so the peasants are invited to comply with the system that gobbles up 3/5-4/5ths of their crop and not organize a revolt.