enervate

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enervate

(ĕn′ər-vāt′)
tr.v. ener·vated, ener·vating, ener·vates
Medicine To remove a nerve or part of a nerve.
adj. (ĭ-nûr′vĭt)
Deprived of strength; debilitated.

en′er·va′tion n.
en′er·va′tive adj.
en′er·va′tor n.

enervate

(ĕn′ĕr-vāt)
To make weak or to lessen the vitality of.
References in periodicals archive ?
This book - itself given a Factory catalogue number, 'Fac 461' - is wonderfully functional, vivid and enervating, much in the image of the label itself.
Not we chickens (and some roosters, too) who follow our physicians' game plans with hopeful, if enervating, endurance.
The Indian Government has now announced the most pro-life policy of modern times; straws in the wind, perhaps, but let us be grateful for such glimmers of light amidst the enervating darkness of modernity.
Yet it can do you a big favour this week, but only if you can ward off the enervating potential of the full Moon.
As one axon dies, the one next to it will take over for it," he said, describing a theory that has proved true in the extremities and may apply to motor neurons enervating diaphragmatic muscles as well.
The first one is subsumed in a jingoistic war on terrorism, while the second is nurtured by an enervating domestic miasma of crass, and often vulgar, hip-hop consumerism.
What an enervating thought to have your president continuously inform the American public that through his fine efforts the Iraqi people are doing better and their country is better off.
From the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego, Latin American filmmakers offered up ferocious, tough-minded, tender and aesthetically freewheeling films about death (in the enervating and utterly captivating Los muertos from Argentina), loss of innocence (in the Louis Malle-esque tale of boyhood friendship set during the coup in 1973 Chile in Machuca), dreams of freedom (in the talented young Brazilian director Jorge Furtado's latest, The Man Who Counted), the peculiarities of human relationship (in the International Critics Prize-winning Whisky, the second feature by the Uruguayan directorial team of Juan-Pablo Rebella and Pablo Stoll) and the absurdities of adolescence (in the wry Mexican feature that is one part Jim Jarmusch, one part Carlos Carrera, Duck Season).
In contrast to the enervating effects of the sordid scandal itself, the aftermath of impeachment felt liberating, clarifying, energizing
Larrieu handily demonstrated the difference between discomfort, which can be interesting (see Charmatz), and enervating boredom.
There is also the penetrating winter cold, the hunger, the tension, the enervating boredom, the desperate one-time use of the firelock to shoot geese and ducks for provisions.
Compared to predominantly ex-urban white evangelical churches," DiIulio told the National Association of Evangelicals, "urban African-American and Latino faith communities have benevolent traditions and histories that make them generally more dedicated to community-serving missions, and generally more confident about engaging public and secular partners in achieving those missions without enervating their spiritual identities or religious characters.