laser

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laser

 [la´zer]
a device that transfers light of various frequencies into an extremely intense, small, and nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation in the visible or invisible spectrum, with all the waves in phase; capable of mobilizing immense heat and power when focused at close range, lasers act on tissues by photocoagulation and photodisruption and are used in surgery, in diagnosis, and in physiological studies.
argon laser a laser with ionized argon as the active medium and with a beam in the blue and green visible light spectrum; used for photocoagulation.
carbon-dioxide laser a laser with carbon dioxide gas as the active medium and that produces infrared radiation at 10,600 nm; used to excise and incise tissue and to vaporize.
excimer laser (excited dimer) a laser with rare gas halides as the active medium, used in ophthalmological procedures and angioplasty. The beam is in the ultraviolet spectrum and penetrates tissues only a small distance; it breaks chemical bonds instead of generating heat to destroy tissue.
holmium:YAG laser a laser whose active medium is a crystal of yttrium, aluminum, and garnet doped with holmium ions, and whose beam is in the near infrared spectrum at 2100 nm; used for photocoagulation and photoablation.
neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser a laser whose active medium is a crystal of yttrium, aluminum, and garnet doped with neodymium ions, and whose beam is in the near infrared spectrum at approximately 1060 nm; used for photocoagulation and photoablation.

la·ser

(lā'zĕr),
1. (noun) A device that generates an intense, narrow beam of light created by bombarding an active medium (for example, CO2, Nd:YAG, argon), with energy in the form of high-voltage electricity, high-intensity light, or radio frequency waves. By passing through a mirrored tube, the photons are released as a nondivergent ("collimated"), monochromatic (all one wavelength), coherent (all in phase) beam. Lasers are used in microsurgery, for cauterization, excision, and for a variety of diagnostic purposes. The wavelength delivered depends on the active medium excited; targetted tissues ("chromophores") are determined by the laser wavelength that they absorb. Laser dosage, or fluence, delivered is derived by dividing the energy delivered by the cross-sectional area of the beam (Joules/CM2). Lasers can be based on numerous chemical sources, gas, liquid, and solid, some of which are listed in the chart on p. 1051. Lasers are widely used in printers of text or x-ray images.
See also: chromophore.
2. (verb) To treat a structure with a laser beam.
See also: chromophore.
[acronym coined from light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation]

laser

/la·ser/ (la´zer) a device that transfers light of various frequencies into an extremely intense, small, and nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation in the visible region, with all the waves in phase; capable of mobilizing immense heat and power when focused at close range, it is used as a tool in surgery, in diagnosis, and in physiological studies.
Enlarge picture
Relative positions of various types of lasers on the electromagnetic spectrum.

argon laser  a laser with ionized argon as the active medium, whose beam is in the blue and green visible light spectrum; used for photocoagulation.
carbon-dioxide laser  a laser with carbon dioxide gas as the active medium, which produces infrared radiation at 10,600 nm; used to excise and incise tissue and to vaporize.
dye laser  a laser with organic dye as the active medium, whose beam is in the visible light spectrum.
excimer laser  a laser with rare gas halides as the active medium, whose beam is in the ultraviolet spectrum and penetrates tissues only a short distance; used in ophthalmological procedures and laser angioplasty.
helium-neon laser  a laser with a mixture of ionized helium and neon gases as the active medium, whose beam is in the red visible light spectrum; used as a guiding beam for lasers operating at nonvisible wavelengths.
krypton laser  a laser with krypton ionized by electric current as the active medium, whose beam is in the yellow-red visible light spectrum; used for photocoagulation.
KTP laser  one in which a beam generated by a neodymium:YAG laser is directed through a potassium titanyl phosphate crystal to produce a beam in the green visible spectrum; used for photoablation and photocoagulation.
neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser  a laser whose active medium is a crystal of yttrium, aluminum, and garnet doped with neodymium ions, and whose beam is in the near infrared spectrum at 1060 nm; used for photocoagulation and photoablation.
potassium titanyl phosphate laser  KTP l.

laser

[lā′zər]
abbreviation for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation, a source of intense monochromatic radiation of the visible, ultraviolet, or infrared portions of the spectrum. Lasers are used in surgery to divide or cause adhesions or to destroy or fix tissue in place. Also called optic laser.

laser

Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation, Physics A device that provides a focused beam of light with enough energy to cut or coagulate tissue Surgery A tool that focuses light into an intense, narrow beam to cut or destroy tissue Applications Microsurgery, photodynamic therapy, diagnostics Types of lasers Argon-405 nm wavelength, CO2-630 nm, tunable dye-1600 nm, YAG-neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet-10,600 nm. See Argon laser, Excimer laser, Holmium pulsed laser, Nd:YAG laser, PTP laser, Roller ball technique, Selective photothermolysis, Yellow krypton laser.
Lasers in medicine
Type/General uses  Specialty/Wavelength/Power or energy
Alexandrite DR, ENT, O, U/700-800 nm//≤ 1 J/pulse
Argon/Coagulation DN, DR, ENT, O, U/450-515 nm//≤ 6 W
CO2/Cutting, vaporization C, DN, DR, ENT, GS, GY, NS, OS, U//10.6 µm/≤ 100 W
Diode GS, U/800 nm//≤ 50W
Er:YAG  DN, O/2.94 µm/≤ 1 J//pulse
Excimer C, O/193 nm/≤ 0.6 J//pulse
Holmium YAG C, O, OS/2.10 µm//≤ 60 W
Nd:YAG/Volume coagulation DN, DR, O/532, 1064 nm//≤ 0.5 J/pulse
Nd:YAG, CW C, DR, ENT, GI, GS, NS, OS, U/532, 1064, 1044 nm//≤ 125 W
Pulsed dye DR, O, U/504-620 nm//≤ 2 J/pulse
Ruby DR/694nm//≤ 2 J/pulse  
C–Cardiology, DN–Dentistry, DR–Dermatology, ENT, GI, GS–General surgery, GY–Gynecology NS–Neurology, O–Ophthalmology, OS–Orthopedic surgery, PS–Plastic surgery, PU–Pulmonology, U–Urology

la·ser

(lā'zĕr)
1. (noun) Device that concentrates high energies into an intense narrow beam of nondivergent monochromatic electromagnetic radiation; used in microsurgery, cauterization, and for a variety of diagnostic purposes.
2. (verb) To treat a structure with a laser beam.
[acronym coined from light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation]

laser

Acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. A device that produces light of a single, precisely defined wavelength, in which all the waves are in phase with each other (coherent light). This allows the beam to be intensely concentrated, with little tendency to spread out, and permits focusing into a spot of microscopic size. The properties of the various lasers make them invaluable for a variety of medical and surgical purposes, and a many laser types, including argon lasers, various YAG lasers, carbon dioxide lasers, various pumped dye lasers and high-precision excimer lasers, are being exploited for this purpose. See also LASER THERAPY.

Laser

A device that concentrates electromagnetic radiation into a narrow beam and treats tissue quickly without heating surrounding areas.
Mentioned in: Arthroscopic Surgery

laser

acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation; device concentrates high-frequency electromagnetic energy into a (constant or pulsed) beam of monochromatic light (wavelength 660-950 nm); therapeutic action (burning, cutting or tissue stimulation) is dependent on device specification; tissue effects are inhibited by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids
  • chronic wound treatment with laser improved healing rates in chronic wounds (after initial deterioration and increase in exudation); used with caution over epiphyseal lines (in children) or photosensitive tissue; contraindicated with neoplasm and haemorrhage; indications: for laser treatment management of bone repair, verrucae, pain relief, myofascial pain, chronic heel pain, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, neuralgia, soft tissues and overuse injury, chronic wounds, burns, scar tissue

  • manner of use laser probe (protected by a layer of cling film) held at 90° to, and in contact with, skin surface

  • power of a laser laser energy density (in J/cm2) is directly proportional to product of probe power (in watts) and exposure time (in seconds), and inversely proportional to area irradiated (in square centimetres)

  • tissue effects of laser dose-dependent increased inflammatory response, immunological effects and capillary formation

laser,

n acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation.
Enlarge picture
Laser.

laser

An intense luminous source of coherent and monochromatic light. The term is an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. Lasers are used in the treatment of a variety of ocular conditions, especially of the cornea, the retina (e.g. detached retina, diabetic retinopathy), glaucoma and refractive errors. See cyclodiode; iridotomy; photorefractive keratectomy; LASEK; LASIK; scanning laser ophthalmoscope; photocoagulation; trabeculoplasty.
argon laser A laser with ionized argon gas as the active medium, which emits a blue-green light beam with a wavelength of 514 nm. It may be used to perform iridectomy, iridoplasty, iridotomy, photocoagulation or trabeculoplasty.
excimer laser A gas laser that emits pulses of light in the ultraviolet region (at 193 nm). All the energy is absorbed by the superficial layers (e.g. the corneal epithelium), which are then exploded away or ablated without any change to the underlying or adjacent tissue or material. See photorefractive keratectomy; LASEK; LASIK.
laser interferometry See clinical maxwellian view system.
laser iridotomy See iridotomy.
krypton laser A laser with krypton gas ionized by electric current as the active medium, which emits a light beam in the yellow-red region of the visible spectrum (521 nm, 568 nm or 647 nm). It may be used to perform photocoagulation or trabeculoplasty.
neodymium-yag laser  (Nd-Yag) A solid-state laser whose active medium is a crystal of yttrium, aluminium and garnet doped with neodymium ions. It emits an infrared light beam with a wavelength of 1064 nm. It is typically used with a slit-lamp and in conjunction with a helium-neon laser which produces a red beam of light (633 nm) to allow focusing. It may be used to perform capsulotomy, iridotomy or trabecular surgery. Yag is an acronym for yttrium-aluminium-garnet.
laser refraction See laser refraction.
laser refractive keratoplasty See photorefractive keratectomy.
laser trabeculoplasty See laser trabeculoplasty.

la·ser

(lā'zĕr)
A device that generates an intense, narrow beam of light created by bombarding an active medium (e.g., CO2, Nd:YAG, argon), with energy in the form of high-voltage electricity, high-intensity light, or radio frequency waves. Lasers are used in microsurgery, for cauterization, excision, and for diagnostic purposes.
[acronym coined from light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation]

laser,

n a high-energy coordinated light source used in surgery, including the removal of the hard tissues and soft tissues of the periodontium.
laser whitening (bleaching),
n a process for bleaching teeth whereby a bleaching powder or other agent is applied to the teeth and then activated by laser light.

laser

a device which generates an extremely intense, small and nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation in the visible region, with all the waves in phase; capable of mobilizing immense heat and power when focused at close range, it is used as a tool in surgery, in diagnosis, and in physiological studies. Laser is an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation.
Used also as a modern version of acupuncture and considered to be the biggest breakthrough in that technology for 5000 years. It provides a quick, painless and noninvasive method of point stimulation.

argon laser
used in ophthalmic surgery and in photodynamic surgery of the skin.
carbon dioxide laser
used in microsurgery and ophthalmic procedures.
low-energy laser therapy
used for wound healing and pain relief; includes visible red helium-neon lasers, invisible infrared gallium-arsenide lasers and gallium-aluminum-arsenid lasers.
laser therapy
in acupuncture the application of low intensity laser to acupuncture points.

Patient discussion about laser

Q. Should I have eye laser surgery? I am 17 and have been wearing glasses since I was a kid. I was thinking of having an eye laser surgery in order to fix my eyesight. What are the risks?

A. i had the surgery done almost a year and a half ago, i love it,the risk is minamal,do it,u won"t regret it,i now have 20/15 vision, and i was blind as a bat before,20/15 is over perfect vision!!!!!!!!!!!!

Q. Is there a laser vision correction operation that will correct both near and farsightedness? My optometrist said that typical laservision would require that I wear glasses for reading since it only corrects farsightedness. I'm leery of the technique of doing only one eye for distance and leaving the other "as is" for reading. I seem to recall a brief news report of some new laser vision technique that corrects both near- and farsightedness. Is that true or were they referring to the "one eye for closeup and one eye for distance" type of correction that I'm skeptical about? Thanks!!

A. my mother-in-law had that done about a yeara ago,for both near and far,they make them the oppisite,i had my near sightness fixed two years ago and i love it should of done it sooner.....

Q. I may have to undergo Laser Acupuncture next week. I am taking medicines for the heart attack I had last year and on my sons wish I am following acupuncture and after observation I may have to undergo Laser Acupuncture next week….I am afraid that this laser can lead to cancer …..And I also worried about the impact and effect of the medicine which I am taking…though my attack is in control will it be good to go for laser.?

A. Yes…This treatment is proved successful in many patients and you will have benefits too with this. They use laser to control the disease and it cannot cause cancer so don’t worry. Laser is being used in the treatment and it will not have any negative results in you. Just follow the medicines which you are currently taking and you will be guided with post surgery medications later.

More discussions about laser