inhibition

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Related to endproduct inhibition: feedback inhibition

inhibition

 [in″hĭ-bish´un]
1. arrest or restraint of a process.
2. in psychoanalysis, the conscious or unconscious restraining of an impulse or desire. adj., adj inhib´itory.
competitive inhibition inhibition of enzyme activity by an inhibitor (a substrate analogue) that competes with the substrate for binding sites on the enzymes.
contact inhibition inhibition of cell division and cell motility in normal animal cells when in close contact with each other.
noncompetitive inhibition inhibition of enzyme activity by substances that combine with the enzyme at a site other than that utilized by the substrate.

in·hi·bi·tion

(in'hi-bi'shŭn),
1. Depression or arrest of a function.
See also: inhibitor.
2. In psychoanalysis, the restraining of instinctive or unconscious drives or tendencies, especially if they conflict with one's conscience or with societal demands.
3. In psychology, a generic term for a variety of processes associated with the gradual attenuation, masking, and extinction of a previously conditioned response.
4. The reduction of the rate of a reaction or process.
[L. inhibeo, pp. -hibitus, to keep back, fr. habeo, to have]

inhibition

/in·hi·bi·tion/ (in″hĭ-bish´un)
1. arrest or restraint of a process.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, the conscious or unconscious restraining of an impulse or desire.

competitive inhibition  inhibition of enzyme activity in which the inhibitor (a substrate analogue) competes with the substrate for binding sites on the enzymes.
contact inhibition  inhibition of cell division and cell motility in normal animal cells when in close contact with each other.
endproduct inhibition , feedback inhibition inhibition of the initial steps of a process by an endproduct of the reaction.
noncompetitive inhibition  inhibition of enzyme activity by substances that combine with the enzyme at a site other than that utilized by the substrate.

inhibition

(ĭn′hə-bĭsh′ən, ĭn′ə-)
n.
1. The act of inhibiting or the state of being inhibited.
2. Something that restrains, blocks, or suppresses.
3. Psychology Conscious or unconscious restraint of a behavioral process, desire, or impulse.
4.
a. Chemistry The condition in which or the process by which a reaction is inhibited.
b. Biology The condition in which or the process by which an enzyme, for example, is inhibited.

inhibition

[in′hibish′ən]
Etymology: L, inhibere, to restrain
1 (in psychology) the unconscious restraint of a behavioral process, usually resulting from the social or cultural forces of the environment; the condition inducing such restraint.
2 (in psychoanalysis) the process in which the superego prevents the conscious expression of an unconscious instinctual drive, thought, or urge.
3 (in physiology) the restraint, checking, or arrest of the action of an organ or cell or the reduction of a physiological activity by antagonistic stimulation.
4 (in chemistry) the stopping or slowing of the rate of a chemical reaction.

inhibition

Psychiatry Behavior that reflects an unconscious defense against forbidden instinctive drives, which may interfere with or restrict specific activities. See Competitive inhibition, Disinhibition, Enzyme inhibition, Feedback inhibition, Multidrug-resistance inhibition, Outlaw inhibition, Postsynaptic inhibition, Presymptomatic inhibition, Reciprocal inhibition.

in·hi·bi·tion

(in'hi-bish'ŭn)
1. Depression or arrest of a function.
See also: inhibitor
2. psychoanalysis The restraining of instinctual or unconscious drives or tendencies, especially if they conflict with one's conscience or with societal demands.
3. psychology The gradual attenuation, masking, and extinction of a previously conditioned response.
[L. inhibeo, pp. -hibitus, to keep back, fr. habeo, to have]

inhibition

Arrest or limitation of a function or activity.

inhibition

a state in which an enzyme is unable to catalyse reactions. See COMPETITIVE INHIBITION and NONCOMPETITIVE INHIBITION.

Inhibition

Referring to the moment in an Alexander lesson when the student refrains from beginning a movement in order to avoid tensing of the muscles.

inhibition

depression or arrest of function

in·hi·bi·tion

(in'hi-bish'ŭn)
1. Depression or arrest of a function.
See also: inhibitor
2. Reduction of rate of reaction or process.
[L. inhibeo, pp. -hibitus, to keep back, fr. habeo, to have]

inhibition (in´hibish´ən),

n a neurologic phenomenon associated with the transmission of an impulse across a synapse. An impulse can be blocked from passing a synapse in a reflex situation by the firing of another, more dominant nerve. It can be achieved directly by preventing the passage of an impulse along an axon, or it can be achieved by liberation of a chemical substance at the nerve ending. This chemical inhibition is demonstrated by the sympathetic-parasympathetic control over smooth muscle activity in a blood vessel. Inhibition is the restraining of a function of a tissue or organ by some nervous or hormone control. It is the opposite of
excitation.

inhibition

arrest or restraint of a process.

competitive inhibition
inhibition of enzyme activity by an inhibitor (a substrate analog) that competes with the substrate for binding sites on the enzymes.
contact inhibition
inhibition of cell division and cell motility in normal animal cells when in close contact with each other.
end-product inhibition
see feedback inhibition (below).
feedback inhibition
a common way of regulating enzyme activity in which the reaction product (or in the case of a biosynthetic pathway, the product of the reaction sequence) inhibits the enzyme activity. Called also end-product inhibition.
neurological inhibition
the intermittency of transmission of nervous impulses depends on variations in the balance between excitation and inhibition, the latter being either pre- or postsynaptic.
noncompetitive inhibition
inhibition of enzyme activity by substances that combine with the enzyme at a site other than that utilized by the substrate.