endosymbiosis


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endosymbiosis

(ĕn′dō-sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n.
A symbiotic association in which one or more organisms live inside another, such as bacteria in human intestines.

en′do·sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

endosymbiosis

(ĕn″dō-sĭm″bē-ō′sĭs) [″ + ″]
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms in which one lives within the body of the other.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Endosymbiosis is now a well substantiated theory that explains how cells gained their great complexity and was made famous most recently by the work of the late biologist Lynn Margulis, best known for her theory on the origin of eukaryotic organelles.
This process, termed primary endosymbiosis, gave rise to the plastid, which is the specialized compartment where photosynthesis takes place in cells.
Endosymbiosis in Ordovician-Silurian corals and stromatoporoids: a new lingulid and its trace from eastern Canada.
be the result of endosymbiosis between a cyanobacterium and a eukaryotic
We must also include in this mix Lynn Margolus' idea of endosymbiosis, in which the eukaryotic cell is posited to be a multiple symbiont composed of one or more prokaryotic hosts (Margulis 1991, 1998).
The Chlorarachniophyceae are unicellular eukaryotic algae characterized by an amoeboid morphology that may be the result of secondary endosymbiosis of a green alga by a nonphotosynthetic amoeba or amoeboflagellate.
The apicoplast is a newly identified residual plastid acquired by secondary endosymbiosis that has attracted attention for its evolutionary novelty and its potential as a drug target.
Endosymbiosis fell out of fashion for many decades, but in the early 1970s, Lynn Margulis of the University of Massachusetts in Amherst breathed new life into the idea.
In the 1970s, University of Massachusetts biologist Lynn Margulis explicated the process of endosymbiosis, in which mitochondria evolved from bacteria and became incorporated, 1.
This endosymbiosis, or merging of two cells, enabled the evolution of a highly stable and successful organism with the capacity to use energy from sunlight via photosynthesis.
Novel chemoautotrophic endosymbiosis between a member of the epsilonproteobacteria and the hydrothermal-vent gastropod Alviniconeha aff.
The Serial Endosymbiosis Theory: Cellular Origins and Intelligent Design Theory," 57:2, 98, J 2005.