endosymbiosis


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endosymbiosis

(ĕn′dō-sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n.
A symbiotic association in which one or more organisms live inside another, such as bacteria in human intestines.

en′do·sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

endosymbiosis

(ĕn″dō-sĭm″bē-ō′sĭs) [″ + ″]
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms in which one lives within the body of the other.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the third step, the host cell promoted the transfer of more than 80% of the symbiont genes into the host's cell genome during the early stage of endosymbiosis.
DNA Transfer from Organelles to the Nucleus: The Idiosyncratic Genetics of Endosymbiosis.
Endosymbiosis is now a well substantiated theory that explains how cells gained their great complexity and was made famous most recently by the work of the late biologist Lynn Margulis, best known for her theory on the origin of eukaryotic organelles.
This process, termed primary endosymbiosis, gave rise to the plastid, which is the specialized compartment where photosynthesis takes place in cells.
Endosymbiosis in Ordovician-Silurian corals and stromatoporoids: a new lingulid and its trace from eastern Canada.
Evidence for the establishment of aphid-eubacterium endosymbiosis in an ancestor of four aphid families.
be the result of endosymbiosis between a cyanobacterium and a eukaryotic
We must also include in this mix Lynn Margolus' idea of endosymbiosis, in which the eukaryotic cell is posited to be a multiple symbiont composed of one or more prokaryotic hosts (Margulis 1991, 1998).
The Chlorarachniophyceae are unicellular eukaryotic algae characterized by an amoeboid morphology that may be the result of secondary endosymbiosis of a green alga by a nonphotosynthetic amoeba or amoeboflagellate.
Endosymbiosis of phloem sap sucking planthoppers with special reference to Sogatodes orizicola (Muir) feeding on Oryza sativa L.
The apicoplast is a newly identified residual plastid acquired by secondary endosymbiosis that has attracted attention for its evolutionary novelty and its potential as a drug target.
Something borrowed, something green: Lateral transfer of chloroplasts by secondary endosymbiosis.