endorsement

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endorsement

 [en-dors´ment]
the examination by a State Board of Nursing of the credentials of a nurse licensed in a different state, and the determination that the nurse is eligible to receive a nursing license in the second state.

endorsement

[endôrs′mənt]
Etymology: Gk, en + L, dorsum, the back
a statement of recognition of the license of a health practitioner in one state by another state. An endorsement relieves the health practitioner of the necessity of completing the full licensing procedure of the state in which practice is to be undertaken.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our identification strategy relies on the daily variation in both endorsements and the winning probability.
From that perspective, endorsements can become part of a strategy to ensure that your profile includes those key words people will use to find your profile in the first place.
The law regarding financial responsibility endorsements is continuing to develop.
1) Endorsements must be truthful and not misleading;
The firms publicizing celebrity endorsements do not undergo positive abnormal returns.
In contrast, the Higher Education Endorsement Program focuses on the financial and business competencies that are required for students' long-term careers.
You may not realize it, but you have some options when dealing with endorsements on LinkedIn:
The average incumbent president loses 5 percent of his endorsements when he runs for re-election.
Factors that vary widely from newspaper to newspaper, and that have changed in recent years, are the number of endorsements made and at what level of elected office.
To estimate the influence of newspaper endorsements, the researchers used individual-level data on voting intentions and newspaper readership in the months leading up to the 2000 and 2004 elections.
The 2010 edition adds several additional insured endorsements addressing building owners, grantors of franchises, and owners, lessees or contractors--completed operations.
But Malicious Damage Endorsement is an Extension of the Riot and Strike Endorsement of the Fire Insurance Policy and, in my opinion, the same should therefore follow my write-up, in respect of the later Endorsement, I am of the opinion that doing so would render the context of Malicious Damage Endorsement more comprehensible to understand: