endorphins


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Related to endorphins: dopamine, serotonin

en·dor·phins

(en-dōr'finz, en'dōr-finz),
Opioid peptides originally isolated from the brain but now found in many parts of the body; in the nervous system, endorphins bind to the same receptors that bind exogenous opiates. A variety of endorphins (for example, α, β, and γ) that vary not only in their physical and chemical properties but also in physiologic action have been isolated.
See also: enkephalins.
[fr. endogenous morphine]

endorphins

A number of morphine-like peptide substances naturally produced in the body and for which morphine receptors exist in the brain. Many of these active substances have been found, all with the same opioid core of five amino acids. They are neurotransmitters and have a wide range of functions. They help to regulate heart action, general hormone function, the mechanisms of shock from blood loss and the perception of pain, and are probably involved in controlling mood, emotion and motivation. They are thought to be produced under various circumstances in which acute relief of pain or mental distress is required. At least some of the endorphins are produced by the PITUITARY gland as part of the precursor of the ACTH molecule. Endorphins are fragments cleaved from the beta-lipotropin component of proopiomelanocortin (POMC). The term derives from the phrase ‘endogenous morphines’.

Endorphins

Pain-killing substances produced in the human body and released by stress or trauma. Some researchers think that people who mutilate themselves are trying to trigger the release of endorphins.

endorphins

group of opioid peptides made in nerve cells in the brain and released from their axons as neurotransmitters or neurohormones, which bind to and activate opioid receptors of other cells (where opioid drugs also act). The first to be identified in brain tissue (1970s) were named enkephalins; many more were later identified. They are released in strenuous exercise and in stressful or painful situations. Subgroups have varied and widespread actions, diminishing the sensation of pain, inducing euphoria (e.g. 'runner's high') and interacting with the immune system.

endorphins

naturally occurring opioids liberated within brain, spinal cord and peripheral tissues during exercise; interact with tissue opiate receptors, inducing pain reduction, euphoria and general well-being

endorphins,

n.pl polypeptides produced in the body that bind the neuroreceptors in brain and act on the central and peripheral nervous system to alleviate pain.

en·dor·phins

(en-dōr'finz)
Opioid peptides originally isolated from the brain but now found in many parts of the body.

endorphins (endor´fins),

n.pl substances produced in the brain and pituitary gland that reduce pain sensations by binding to receptors in the nervous system. The three endorphins, called alpha-, beta-, and gamma-endorphin, are subsequences of the 91-amino-acid peptide hormone, beta-lipotropin.
References in periodicals archive ?
This UV light-seeking behavior seemed to hinge on endorphins: When people's endorphins were blocked with a different drug called naltrexone, they no longer distinguished between the real and fake tanning beds, a failure that suggests they had become immune to the rewards of UV light.
And, in all of the subjects, the more endorphins released in the nucleus accumbens, the greater the feelings of pleasure reported by each drinker.
Serotonin is another chemical which, like endorphins, makes you feel good.
But this preference fell away with the 15- and 25-mg doses of naltrexone, "suggesting that light-induced endorphins are reinforcing [frequent tanners'] behavior," says report coauthor Mandeep Kaur, also a dermatology professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.
Such medications are understood to affect the brain's endorphin system.
The reason for this is believed to be because endorphins which are released during exercise are a feelgood hormones which help lift your mood and cheer you up.
The Prostop soft laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) releases endorphins in the body, which temporarily saturate the nicotine receptors.
Steve Feldman, a dermatologist (skin doctor) at Wake Forest University, believes UV rays cause the skin to release anti-pain agents called endorphins, which make tanners feel relaxed.
This muscle-control action relies on Italian curry plant extract to relax irritated skin and promote the production of "feel-good" endorphins.
Laughter increases the secretion of energizing catecholamines and endorphins, increases oxygenation of the blood, and decreases residual air in the lungs.
And exercise regularly to release endorphins, your body's natural painkillers.
Feldman has speculated that the brain releases those feel-good endorphins in response to UV light much as it does after exercise.