endophyte

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endophyte

 [en´do-fīt]
a parasitic plant organism living within its host's body.

en·do·phyte

(en'dō-fīt),
A plant parasite living within another organism.
[endo- + G. phyton, plant]

endophyte

/en·do·phyte/ (en´do-fīt) a parasitic plant organism living within its host's body.

en·do·phyte

(en'dō-fīt)
A plant parasite living within another organism.
[endo- + G. phyton, plant]

endophyte

an ORGANISM, often a FUNGUS or BACTERIUM, living entirely within a PLANT and generally as a PARASITE on it.

endophyte

a parasitic plant living within its host's body.
References in periodicals archive ?
2004a) Symbiotic lifestyle expression by fungal endophytes and the adaptation of plants to stress: unraveling the complexities of intimacy.
One way to avoid fescue toxicosisis to grow tall fescue with nontoxic strains of the fungal endophyte.
The results, said Rodriguez, were dramatic: the endophytes reduced water consumption of the plant by up to one half, and increased its growth, the number of seeds it produced, and how much it weighed by as much as 50 percent.
A first-hand experience of bird strike several years ago got Pennell thinking about the possibility of using his research on endophytes to develop a 'bird-scaring grass'.
More common in cattle and sometimes in sheep, the problem was caused by a batch of contaminated hay that saw fungi called endophytes, found in the cells of ryegrass, produce toxins.
The research is aimed at reintroducing the 'good microbes', or endophytes, back into the plant at an early stage, thus vaccinating it and offering increased natural defences before being planted in farmers' fields.
McCully ME (2001) Niches for bacterial endophytes in crop plants: a plant biologist's view.
Meanwhile, Agricultural Research Service scientists in the US have found that certain fungal endophytes or plant parasites that install themselves in nooks and crannies of plants keep disease-causing microbes at bay while not causing any harm to the plants.
Other approaches to bad bugs include beneficial nematodes (near-microscopic worms that release killing bacteria), milky spore disease (effective for Japanese beetle larvae) and grass seed enhanced with endophytes (which secrete a bitter-tasting toxin).
Endophytes are fungi that complete their life cycle within the host and remain symptomless during the vegetative phase of parasitism.
Fungal Endophytes as a Driving Force in Land Plant Evolution: Evidence from the Fossil Record