endocardium


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endocardium

 [en″do-kahr´de-um]
the endothelial lining membrane of the cavities of the heart and the connective tissue bed on which it lies.

en·do·car·di·um

, pl.

en·do·car·di·a

(en'dō-kar'dē-ŭm, -ē-ă), [TA]
The innermost tunic of the heart, which includes endothelium and subendothelial connective tissue; in the atrial wall, smooth muscle and numerous elastic fibers also occur.
[endo- + G. kardia, heart]

endocardium

/en·do·car·di·um/ (-kahr´de-um) the endothelial lining membrane of the cavities of the heart and the connective tissue bed on which it lies.

endocardium

(ĕn′dō-kär′dē-əm)
n. pl. endocar·dia (-dē-ə)
The thin serous membrane, composed of endothelial tissue, that lines the interior of the heart.

en′do·car′di·al adj.

endocardium

[en′dōkär′dē·əm] pl. endocardia,
the lining of the heart chambers, containing small blood vessels and a few bundles of smooth muscle. It is continuous with the endothelium of the great blood vessels. Compare epicardium, myocardium.

en·do·car·di·um

, pl. endocardia (en'dō-kahr'dē-ŭm, -ă) [TA]
The innermost tunic of the heart, which includes endothelium and subendothelial connective tissue; in the atrial wall, smooth muscle and numerous elastic fibers also occur.
[endo- + G. kardia, heart]

endocardium

The heart lining that also covers the heart valves.

endocardium

the inner lining of the HEART.

Endocardium

The inner wall of the heart muscle, which also covers the heart valves.
Mentioned in: Endocarditis

en·do·car·di·um

, pl. endocardia (en'dō-kahr'dē-ŭm, -ă) [TA]
The innermost tunic of the heart.
[endo- + G. kardia, heart]

endocardium

(en´dōkär´dēəm),
n the innermost lining and connective tissue bed of the heart's chambers. It consists of smooth muscle cells, elastin, and collagen fibers.

endocardium

the endothelial lining membrane of the cavities of the heart and the connective tissue bed on which it lies.
References in periodicals archive ?
dagger][dagger][dagger]) Chronic disease of the endocardium includes nonrheumatic mitral valve disorders; nonrheumatic aortic valve disorders; nonrheumatic tricuspid valve disorders; pulmonary valve disorders; and endocarditis, valve unspecified.
Comparison of aortic atherosclerotic lesion area, percentage of immunoreactive area for CD40L in the aorta and myocardium / endocardium, the left ventricular weight (LVW) / Animals Weight (AW) ratio and the diameter of cardiomyocytes from HL (hyperlipidemic), HL + NAT (hyperlipidemic submitted to swimming), HL + PRO (hyperlipidemic treated with propolis) and HL + NAT + PRO (hyperlipidemic submitted to swimming and treated with propolis) mice.
Impairment of autonomic nerve function and abnormal electrical activity of the endocardium have been reported in VMC patients who show signs of anxiety and depression.
kingae is carried on the oropharyngeal epithelium (20,21), and the colonized mucosa is the portal of entry of the organism to the bloodstream from which it may disseminate to 3 areas for which the bacterium shows particular tropism: joints, bones, or the endocardium (22,23).
The infection of native valvular endocardium together with the infection of prosthetic heart valves and intracardiac devices represents today an important burden for society [1].
Infective endocarditis (IE) is an infection of the cardiac valves or mural endocardium caused by bacteria and fungi producing a wide variety of systemic signs and symptoms through several mechanisms, including both sterile and infected emboli and various immunological phenomena.
All cardiac structures, the pericardium, myocardium, endocardium, valves and vascular beds, may be affected individually or as part of an overall condition (1,2) that varies in its frequency and severity (3).
Serotype Typhi-related bacteraemia is commonly associated with extra intestinal disease involving liver, spleen, lymph nodes, skin, bones, joints, endocardium, or central nervous system.
Other findings included petechial hemorrhages in epicardium and endocardium and congestion of the lungs; all other organs appeared normal.
The development of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) may occur over years or even decades, as recurrent inflammation of the endocardium, and especially the heart valves, leads to increased fibrosis and scarring.
kingae can reach other areas of infection, like joints and the endocardium.