endemic

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endemic

 [en-dem´ik]
present or usually prevalent in a population or geographical area at all times, in contrast to epidemic; the term is used of a disease or agent.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik),
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which the disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations in its frequency over time. Compare: epidemic, sporadic.
Synonym(s): enzootic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

/en·dem·ic/ (en-dem´ik) present or usually prevalent in a population at all times.

endemic

(ĕn-dĕm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Prevalent in or limited to a particular locality, region, or people: diseases endemic to the tropics.
2. Native to or limited to a certain region: endemic birds.
n.
An endemic plant or animal.

en·dem′i·cal·ly adv.
en·dem′ism n.

endemic

[endem′ik]
Etymology: Gk, endemos, native
(of a disease or microorganism) the expected or "normal" incidence indigenous to a geographic area or population. See also epidemic, pandemic.

endemic

adjective
(1) Referring to the usual prevalence of a given disease or infection in an area or group. Endemic conditions do not exhibit wide fluctuations over time in a defined place.
(2) For microparasites, such as measles, endemic refers to an infection that can persist in a population in the long term without reintroduction from outside.

endemic

adjective Referring to an infection or condition which doesn't widely fluctuate over time in a defined place, or which persists in a population without being reintroduced from outside

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Present in a community or among a group of people; said of a disease prevailing continually in a region.
Compare: epidemic, sporadic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

Occurring continuously in a particular population. Literally, ‘among the people’. See also EPIDEMIC and PANDEMIC.

endemic

(of organisms or disease) having a distribution limited to a particular geographical area such as an island.

Endemic

Natural to or characteristic of a particular place, population, or climate. Threadworm infections are endemic in the tropics.

endemic

disease or pathology with regional, community or group prevalence

endemic,

n the occurrence of certain diseases as they relate to a population or geographic area.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations.
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic,

adj peculiar to a specific location or region, or within a specific group of people.

endemic

present in a predictable, continuous pattern in an animal community at all times; said of a disease which is clustered in space but not in time. See also enzootic.

endemic erosive stomatitis
resembles bovine papular stomatitis. Recorded in Africa as spreading to and from cattle and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
The flora opens with an introduction to the archipelago, including discussions of its geography, geology, hydrology, the origin of the flora, endemism, plant communities, natural resources, agriculture, plant products, bush medicine, and edible and poisonous plants.
The Cerrado is a tropical biome with high plant diversity and endemism, where many unknown interactions between insects and their host plants should occur.
In Madagascar, remarkable for its high level of species endemism, women still have, on average, 5.
Distinct centers of endemism have been pointed out in mainland West Palearctic areas (Deltshev 1999; Marusik & Koponen 2002) and in some Atlantic archipelagoes (Borges & Brown 1999; Arnedo et al.
The Arikareean Land Mammal Age in Texas and Florida: southern extension of Great Plains faunas and Gulf Coastal Plain endemism.
There are also five separate national biodiversity hotspots around the state; the diverse ancient landscape has created a high level of endemism (native speciation), where individual hills or salt lakes may be host to species found nowhere else on earth.
Amphibian endemism is very high in the Pacific with 100% in New Zealand (4th in world), Fiji (5th) Palau (6th), 93.
Known widely during the nineteenth century for their large river shoals and unique fauna, these basins served as primary centers of speciation and endemism for mollusks, fishes, crayfishes, and other aquatic organisms.
In 1989, all species in the genera Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium, the tropical slipper orchids, were transferred to Appendix I because of the high rate of endemism (occurring within a small area) within each genus, the rarity of some species, the similarity of appearance among many species, and their popularity in trade.
This would make the island extra-attractive for students of adaptation and endemism.
As some of the centres of endemism in Baja California are not in nature reserves, these sites have to be preserved despite the presence or absence of protected areas.