endemic

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Related to endemics: Endemic species

endemic

 [en-dem´ik]
present or usually prevalent in a population or geographical area at all times, in contrast to epidemic; the term is used of a disease or agent.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik),
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which the disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations in its frequency over time. Compare: epidemic, sporadic.
Synonym(s): enzootic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

/en·dem·ic/ (en-dem´ik) present or usually prevalent in a population at all times.

endemic

(ĕn-dĕm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Prevalent in or limited to a particular locality, region, or people: diseases endemic to the tropics.
2. Native to or limited to a certain region: endemic birds.
n.
An endemic plant or animal.

en·dem′i·cal·ly adv.
en·dem′ism n.

endemic

[endem′ik]
Etymology: Gk, endemos, native
(of a disease or microorganism) the expected or "normal" incidence indigenous to a geographic area or population. See also epidemic, pandemic.

endemic

adjective
(1) Referring to the usual prevalence of a given disease or infection in an area or group. Endemic conditions do not exhibit wide fluctuations over time in a defined place.
(2) For microparasites, such as measles, endemic refers to an infection that can persist in a population in the long term without reintroduction from outside.

endemic

adjective Referring to an infection or condition which doesn't widely fluctuate over time in a defined place, or which persists in a population without being reintroduced from outside

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Present in a community or among a group of people; said of a disease prevailing continually in a region.
Compare: epidemic, sporadic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

Occurring continuously in a particular population. Literally, ‘among the people’. See also EPIDEMIC and PANDEMIC.

endemic

(of organisms or disease) having a distribution limited to a particular geographical area such as an island.

Endemic

Natural to or characteristic of a particular place, population, or climate. Threadworm infections are endemic in the tropics.

endemic

disease or pathology with regional, community or group prevalence

endemic,

n the occurrence of certain diseases as they relate to a population or geographic area.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations.
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic,

adj peculiar to a specific location or region, or within a specific group of people.

endemic

present in a predictable, continuous pattern in an animal community at all times; said of a disease which is clustered in space but not in time. See also enzootic.

endemic erosive stomatitis
resembles bovine papular stomatitis. Recorded in Africa as spreading to and from cattle and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
To assist in the development of science based protected species list for the Bahamian archipelago, an IUCN Redlist targeting plant endemics should be produced.
To assess which of the endemics occur within The Bahamas and Turks and Caicos protected area system is an essential step to delineate in situ conservation programs.
This checklist of Bahamian endemics was originally based on the works of Correll and Correll (1982; accepted endemics coded as "C&C") and Acevedo-Rodriguez and Strong (2012; accepted endemics coded as "A-R&S").
This appendix includes those species that were accepted as Bahamian endemics by Correll and Correll (1982) (coded as "C&C") or Acevedo-Rodriguez and Strong (2012) (coded as A-R&S) that we do not consider as part of the endemic flora of the archipelago.
They stress the conservation relevance of the Caribbean Island Biodiversity Hotspot because of its: (1) high number of endemics, (2) high rate of habitat loss, and (3) unique branches of the tree of life.
Phylogeny of Robinioid legumes (Fabaceae) revisited: Coursetia and Gliricidia recircumscribed, and a biogeographical appraisal of the Caribbean endemics.
This is a Critically Endangered species endemic to the unique nickel-rich serpentine soil environments of eastern Cuba.
The third example is provided by Erigeron bellidiastroides (Asteraceae), an Endangered (EN) herbaceous species confined to quartz sand areas of western Cuba which is sister to Darwiniothamnus (Asteraceae), a genus endemic to the Galapagos Islands that has a woody habit (Andrus et al.
In the 1800s, it was found only on this island, but it hasn't been spotted since 1901 and is now considered extinct - the only Catalina endemic that did not survive to the modern age.
Some of these "alternative" islands have endemic genera with a relatively high number of species that have exploited different ecosystems [e.
This is the island system with the highest number of endemic genera of the Asteraceae (Table 1).
Therefore, most of the Caribbean Asteraceae endemic species belong to non- endemic genera, and some of them have a relatively high number of endemic species, including Chaptalia Vent.