endemic

(redirected from endemicity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

endemic

 [en-dem´ik]
present or usually prevalent in a population or geographical area at all times, in contrast to epidemic; the term is used of a disease or agent.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik),
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which the disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations in its frequency over time. Compare: epidemic, sporadic.
Synonym(s): enzootic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

/en·dem·ic/ (en-dem´ik) present or usually prevalent in a population at all times.

endemic

(ĕn-dĕm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Prevalent in or limited to a particular locality, region, or people: diseases endemic to the tropics.
2. Native to or limited to a certain region: endemic birds.
n.
An endemic plant or animal.

en·dem′i·cal·ly adv.
en·dem′ism n.

endemic

[endem′ik]
Etymology: Gk, endemos, native
(of a disease or microorganism) the expected or "normal" incidence indigenous to a geographic area or population. See also epidemic, pandemic.

endemic

adjective
(1) Referring to the usual prevalence of a given disease or infection in an area or group. Endemic conditions do not exhibit wide fluctuations over time in a defined place.
(2) For microparasites, such as measles, endemic refers to an infection that can persist in a population in the long term without reintroduction from outside.

endemic

adjective Referring to an infection or condition which doesn't widely fluctuate over time in a defined place, or which persists in a population without being reintroduced from outside

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Present in a community or among a group of people; said of a disease prevailing continually in a region.
Compare: epidemic, sporadic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

Occurring continuously in a particular population. Literally, ‘among the people’. See also EPIDEMIC and PANDEMIC.

endemic

(of organisms or disease) having a distribution limited to a particular geographical area such as an island.

Endemic

Natural to or characteristic of a particular place, population, or climate. Threadworm infections are endemic in the tropics.

endemic

disease or pathology with regional, community or group prevalence

endemic,

n the occurrence of certain diseases as they relate to a population or geographic area.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations.
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic,

adj peculiar to a specific location or region, or within a specific group of people.

endemic

present in a predictable, continuous pattern in an animal community at all times; said of a disease which is clustered in space but not in time. See also enzootic.

endemic erosive stomatitis
resembles bovine papular stomatitis. Recorded in Africa as spreading to and from cattle and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Parsimony analysis of endemicity and its application to animal and plant geographical distributions in the Ibero-Balearic region (western Mediterranean).
School based screening is likely to be more successful in areas of high leprosy endemicity.
Table 1 shows distribution of schools surveyed by level of endemicity.
The included variables were: continental geographic distribution (CGD), endemicity (E), habitat specificity (HS), persistence (P), rarity (R), extractive actions (EA).
amp;lt;i> Plasmodium falciparum</i>: diversity studies of isolates from two Colombian regions with different endemicity.
In countries that have experienced a reduction from high to medium HAV endemicity, large-scale vaccination is likely to be cost-effective (43).
This illustrates an apparent reduced polymorphism based on an analysis of these genes, regardless of the diverse P falciparum endemicity (21, 22).
Serological evidences are suggestive of high endemicity of brucellosis in India.
The circumoval precipitine test (COPT) was initially developed in 1954 by Oliver- Gonzalez12 and proved to be highly sensitive (92-100%) and specific (96-100%) (13,14) for the diagnosis of infestation in areas of low endemicity.
Several areas of high richness and endemicity were added to the list of previous known ones.
Recommendations for screening for other infections are based on endemicity and risk to special recipient groups.
Bubonic plague's endemicity in early modern England placed London at perpetual risk of epidemic.