endemic

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endemic

 [en-dem´ik]
present or usually prevalent in a population or geographical area at all times, in contrast to epidemic; the term is used of a disease or agent.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik),
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which the disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations in its frequency over time. Compare: epidemic, sporadic.
Synonym(s): enzootic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

/en·dem·ic/ (en-dem´ik) present or usually prevalent in a population at all times.

endemic

(ĕn-dĕm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Prevalent in or limited to a particular locality, region, or people: diseases endemic to the tropics.
2. Native to or limited to a certain region: endemic birds.
n.
An endemic plant or animal.

en·dem′i·cal·ly adv.
en·dem′ism n.

endemic

[endem′ik]
Etymology: Gk, endemos, native
(of a disease or microorganism) the expected or "normal" incidence indigenous to a geographic area or population. See also epidemic, pandemic.

endemic

adjective
(1) Referring to the usual prevalence of a given disease or infection in an area or group. Endemic conditions do not exhibit wide fluctuations over time in a defined place.
(2) For microparasites, such as measles, endemic refers to an infection that can persist in a population in the long term without reintroduction from outside.

endemic

adjective Referring to an infection or condition which doesn't widely fluctuate over time in a defined place, or which persists in a population without being reintroduced from outside

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Present in a community or among a group of people; said of a disease prevailing continually in a region.
Compare: epidemic, sporadic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

Occurring continuously in a particular population. Literally, ‘among the people’. See also EPIDEMIC and PANDEMIC.

endemic

(of organisms or disease) having a distribution limited to a particular geographical area such as an island.

Endemic

Natural to or characteristic of a particular place, population, or climate. Threadworm infections are endemic in the tropics.

endemic

disease or pathology with regional, community or group prevalence

endemic,

n the occurrence of certain diseases as they relate to a population or geographic area.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations.
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic,

adj peculiar to a specific location or region, or within a specific group of people.

endemic

present in a predictable, continuous pattern in an animal community at all times; said of a disease which is clustered in space but not in time. See also enzootic.

endemic erosive stomatitis
resembles bovine papular stomatitis. Recorded in Africa as spreading to and from cattle and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evidence of coccidioidomycosis far outside the areas of known endemicity has also been seen in fossil records.
Parsimony analysis of endemicity (PAE) was developed by Rosen (1988) and Rosen and Smith (1988) to address the shortcomings of phenetic approaches used to assess area relationships of fossil or recent assemblages from different areas (Porzecanski and Cracraft, 2005).
Prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Singapore men with sexually transmitted diseases and HIV infection: Role of sexual transmission in a city state with intermediate HBV endemicity.
threat to foreign markets, that viral endemicity need not be reversed in order to protect the quality of Argentine beef, and that a strong confrontational stand on F.
Of the 44 patients, 17 (39%) had a permanent address in the Coccidioides-endemic counties of California (14 [32%] in San Luis Obispo County), 17 (39%) in the less Coccidioides-endemic counties, 6 (14%) in another state with possible Coccidioides endemicity, and 4 (9%) in a non-Coccidioides-endemic state (Table 1; Figure 1, panel B).
When adoption is planned for a child from a country of high or intermediate hepatitis endemicity, persons who will have close personal contact with the adoptee during the first 60 days following arrival of the adoptee in the United States should be identified.
Endemicity Of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Bacterial Agent of Lyme Disease in Middle Tennessee.
have high or intermediate endemicity of hepatitis A.
Table 1 Basic Features of Hepatitis B Virus Infection Agent: * hepatitis B virus (a DNA hepadnavirus) Reservoir: * humans (although primates are susceptible) Occurrence: * worldwide with particularly high endemicity in Africa and the Far East Transmission: * vertical (especially in areas of high endemicity) * percutaneous (e.
Accounting for the endemicity of tuberculosis, which is the main HIV-defining illness in Cameroon, and the fatal outcome of DH in HIV-infected patients, practitioners need a high index of awareness to differentiate between tuberculosis and histoplasmosis.
The examination of the palpable nodules in human body in the endemic communities has been adopted as a rapid diagnostic method of assessing onchocerciasis endemicity as it requires less ethical complications (5).
Incidence of acute malaria infections (percentage by age) among stable indigenous Nicobarese population from January 2008 to March 2008 was calculated to know the endemicity level of malaria at Nancowry (22).