endemic

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endemic

 [en-dem´ik]
present or usually prevalent in a population or geographical area at all times, in contrast to epidemic; the term is used of a disease or agent.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik),
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which the disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations in its frequency over time. Compare: epidemic, sporadic.
Synonym(s): enzootic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

/en·dem·ic/ (en-dem´ik) present or usually prevalent in a population at all times.

endemic

(ĕn-dĕm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Prevalent in or limited to a particular locality, region, or people: diseases endemic to the tropics.
2. Native to or limited to a certain region: endemic birds.
n.
An endemic plant or animal.

en·dem′i·cal·ly adv.
en·dem′ism n.

endemic

[endem′ik]
Etymology: Gk, endemos, native
(of a disease or microorganism) the expected or "normal" incidence indigenous to a geographic area or population. See also epidemic, pandemic.

endemic

adjective
(1) Referring to the usual prevalence of a given disease or infection in an area or group. Endemic conditions do not exhibit wide fluctuations over time in a defined place.
(2) For microparasites, such as measles, endemic refers to an infection that can persist in a population in the long term without reintroduction from outside.

endemic

adjective Referring to an infection or condition which doesn't widely fluctuate over time in a defined place, or which persists in a population without being reintroduced from outside

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Present in a community or among a group of people; said of a disease prevailing continually in a region.
Compare: epidemic, sporadic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

Occurring continuously in a particular population. Literally, ‘among the people’. See also EPIDEMIC and PANDEMIC.

endemic

(of organisms or disease) having a distribution limited to a particular geographical area such as an island.

Endemic

Natural to or characteristic of a particular place, population, or climate. Threadworm infections are endemic in the tropics.

endemic

disease or pathology with regional, community or group prevalence

endemic,

n the occurrence of certain diseases as they relate to a population or geographic area.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations.
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic,

adj peculiar to a specific location or region, or within a specific group of people.

endemic

present in a predictable, continuous pattern in an animal community at all times; said of a disease which is clustered in space but not in time. See also enzootic.

endemic erosive stomatitis
resembles bovine papular stomatitis. Recorded in Africa as spreading to and from cattle and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
29) The disease is encountered endemically countrywide, in the west (Herat), south (Kandahar), north (Mazar-e Szarif), and east (Kabul).
Not one of Ferguson's teams has been populated by players seemingly incapable of standing upright for more than two seconds, endemically infected with the cheat virus and pushing the boundaries of acceptable behaviour at every opportunity.
The place was infested with cracked-out zombies who were endemically covered in open sutures and track marks.
Many of the indigenous peoples of the Caucasus were endemically rebellious and hard to contain, and the Russian colonizers were endemically brutal in their determination to maintain control over them.
In a football tournament the St George flags come out, endemically sweeping through the poor areas.
African American participation in American society seems endemically fraught with devastatingly disproportionate difficulties ranging from critically high incarceration rates to tragic, often-violent, and high mortality rates.
In many key respects, the development and maintenance of defensible liberal sensibilities have throughout modernity been predicated on the continued existence of a symbolically constructed and imagined subaltern other that is demonstrably different, deviant, and endemically rebellious.
That's a major increase in frequency, and a real leap of faith that speaks to our confidence that our advertising is going to continue to grow, both endemically and non-endemically," Triece said.
The Londoner believes the pop industry is endemically racist and hopes to help shatter the stereotypes which stigmatise the Asian communities throughout the UK.
The musical experience is therefore a dialogue, which means--and here is where the argument becomes pertinent--that musical events happen in community, (46) they require an "infusion of life" in order to be music, and they are endemically ethical.
Of in other, less kind, words: Poor countries are endemically corrupt.
The Ganga delta regions are endemically prone to As contamination in groundwater.