endemic


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endemic

 [en-dem´ik]
present or usually prevalent in a population or geographical area at all times, in contrast to epidemic; the term is used of a disease or agent.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik),
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which the disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations in its frequency over time. Compare: epidemic, sporadic.
Synonym(s): enzootic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

/en·dem·ic/ (en-dem´ik) present or usually prevalent in a population at all times.

endemic

(ĕn-dĕm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Prevalent in or limited to a particular locality, region, or people: diseases endemic to the tropics.
2. Native to or limited to a certain region: endemic birds.
n.
An endemic plant or animal.

en·dem′i·cal·ly adv.
en·dem′ism n.

endemic

[endem′ik]
Etymology: Gk, endemos, native
(of a disease or microorganism) the expected or "normal" incidence indigenous to a geographic area or population. See also epidemic, pandemic.

endemic

adjective
(1) Referring to the usual prevalence of a given disease or infection in an area or group. Endemic conditions do not exhibit wide fluctuations over time in a defined place.
(2) For microparasites, such as measles, endemic refers to an infection that can persist in a population in the long term without reintroduction from outside.

endemic

adjective Referring to an infection or condition which doesn't widely fluctuate over time in a defined place, or which persists in a population without being reintroduced from outside

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Present in a community or among a group of people; said of a disease prevailing continually in a region.
Compare: epidemic, sporadic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

Occurring continuously in a particular population. Literally, ‘among the people’. See also EPIDEMIC and PANDEMIC.

endemic

(of organisms or disease) having a distribution limited to a particular geographical area such as an island.

Endemic

Natural to or characteristic of a particular place, population, or climate. Threadworm infections are endemic in the tropics.

endemic

disease or pathology with regional, community or group prevalence

endemic,

n the occurrence of certain diseases as they relate to a population or geographic area.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations.
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic,

adj peculiar to a specific location or region, or within a specific group of people.

endemic

present in a predictable, continuous pattern in an animal community at all times; said of a disease which is clustered in space but not in time. See also enzootic.

endemic erosive stomatitis
resembles bovine papular stomatitis. Recorded in Africa as spreading to and from cattle and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
But this preliminary observation can be validated in other filarial endemic areas with larger number of samples.
Endemic mycoses: blastomycosis, histoplasmosis, and sporotrichosis.
The herbarium data and literature reviews allowed us to record the distribution of the endemic species for each of the 22 island grouping (Appendix 1).
Haiti's only endemic is the Gray-crowned Tanager (Phaenicophilus poliocephalus), a species one may choose to skip to avoid a depressing and potentially hostile tourist environment.
Wherever malaria is endemic and poorly treated, the Millennium Development Goals suffer yet another setback--and this is across a huge swath of sub-Saharan Africa, across Asia and in Central and South America.
The most famous Catalina endemic is Catalina ironwood (Lyonothamnus floribundus), a tree that can reach a height of 30 feet and a spread of 15feet.
Methods: Serum samples were collected from 30 bancroftian microfilaremic (Mf) carriers pre-treatment and at sequential intervals (7,30,60,90,180 and 365 days) following treatment with diethylcarbamazine (DEC:6mg/kg body weight, single dose), 30 lymphoedema patients (without treatment) at periodic intervals, and 68 control subjects (24 endemic normal subjects in filariasis endemic area in Tamil Nadu State, 24 non-endemic normal subjects residing in Chandigarh, India; 5 brugian filariasis, 5 endemic control subject in brugian filariasis endemic area and 10 other disease controls).
This nocturnal predator has the potential to drive all of the Marianas' terrestrial wildlife species to extinction, including all 14 species of endemic forest birds, one endemic freshwater bird (Mariana common moorhen), two endemic mammals (Mariana fruit bat and sheath-tailed bat), two native geckos (Micronesian gecko and rock gecko), and one endemic skink (tide-pool skink).
A spokeswoman said: "TBE at-risk groups include all visitors to rural areas of endemic countries, particularly those participating in outdoor activities such as trekking, hiking, climbing, cycling and camping, who have not taken bite-prevention precautions.
We are talking about the possibility of this disease being endemic here in the UK as it did in China.
For example, Paton has seen a plunge in the number of endemic (native) bird species in areas where koalas have damaged trees.
Clinicians should consider cutaneous leishmaniasis in the differential diagnosis of skin lesions in military personnel who were deployed to areas where the infection is endemic, say the authors of an update in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.