end of life


Also found in: Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

end of life

Cardiac pacing
noun The point at which a pacemaker signals a need for replacement, as its battery is nearing depletion.
 
Medspeak
adjective Referring to a final period (hours, days, weeks, months) in a person’s life, in which it is medically obvious that death is imminent or a terminal moribund state cannot be prevented. As in, end-of-life care.

End-of-life care—making decisions 
Initiate discussion: 
• Establish supportive doctor-patient relationship;
• Designate surrogate decision maker;
• Identify patient’s general preferences.
Clarify prognosis: 
• Keep message clear, avoid misunderstanding;
• Acknowledge prognostic limitations.
Identify end-of-life goals: 
• Determine if preferences have changed;
• Identify individual priorities.
Develop treatment plan: 
• Help patient understand treatment options;
• Discuss resuscitation;
• Discuss palliative care.
References in periodicals archive ?
Refer education regarding specific end of life medication to prescribing physician
End of life decisions: Nurses perceptions, feeling and experiences.
Applications are considered in the following areas: Exploring variation in care at the end of life - research with the potential to enable a better understanding of the way in which the experience of care at the end of life varies across the UK.
Support of patients' spiritual needs by the medical team was also associated with better patient well-being at the end of life, with scores on average being 28 percent higher among those receiving spiritual support.
Physician and nursing groups have developed principles and guidelines for the care of patients at the end of life (Cassel & Foley, 1999; City of Hope, 1999; English & Yocum, 1996; Field & Cassel, 1997).
Flame retardants: The WEEE directive requires all materials containing bromine to be marked and treated separately at the end of life.
At first glance it would seem that THE CASE OF TERRI SCHIAVO: ETHICS AT THE END OF LIFE is another focus on her case alone--but actually its focus on end-of-life ethical questions holds far more meaning for the living than for the dead of the past.
The definition given by the NHCPO is, "deliberately inducing and maintaining deep sleep but not deliberately causing death" when there are "intractable symptoms at the end of life .
For example, in 2001 five of the PDIA social work leaders wrote Care at the End of Life as part of the best practices series for the Society for Social Work Leadership in Health Care (Taylor-Brown, Blacker, Walsh-Burke, Altilio, & Christ, 2001).
At the end of life, palliative care provides options to elderly patients suffering from advanced-stage incurable diseases who either aren't ready or don't meet eligibility requirements for hospice care.
Nursing home residents were less likely than those cared for in a hospital or by home hospice services to always have been treated with respect at the end of life (68.