encrustation


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Related to encrustation: incrustation

encrustation

(ĕn-krŭs-tā′shŭn)
Obstruction of a body part or of a stent placed in the body with granulation tissue or calcified debris. The term is used in particular to refer to blockage of urethral stents.
References in periodicals archive ?
This grant will help us to address the need to develop a novel urinary device that will reduce encrustation to a minimum, resulting in significant cost savings and improvement of quality of life," she says.
As noted earlier, blue/purple cryptocrystalline encrustations also believed to be vivianite have been found on the creek cut bank clays and on gravel of the point bar.
There is minor dissolution and some encrustation by calcifying organisms.
Biofilm and biofilm-related encrustation of urinary tract devices.
Its recommendation followed reports from building owners who saw leakage and related encrustation and corrosion on the Model GB sprinkler.
Oaky Creek spoil on the 10% slope had greater EC, chloride, and sulfate (maximum values in Table 1) than the 20% and 30% slopes (data not identified), and this caused salt encrustation on these plots.
Lasner supplies a valuable encrustation of footnotes.
Why, he has often asked, does human consciousness succumb so readily to encrustation and passivity, the false acceptance of the order of things as eternal and natural?
Currently, scientists are seeking a substance that could help rid ship hulls of encrustation instead of applying protective paints which leach heavy metals into the water.
The Baghdad regime insists that the drainage schemes are part of an ambitious plan to rejuvenate thousands of hectares of farmland rendered useless by salt encrustation.
That leaves an encrustation on the surface, producing a patina.
The author identifies four strands or traditions in the jewelry of this period: 1) Hellenistic Greek, featuring small earrings and the use of filigree and granulation; 2) the "new Iranian tradition" of wide belts with decorative metal plaques; 3) an "old Iranian" tradition identified with Scythians and Sarmatians and characterized by the use of semi-precious stones in encrustation, and 4) a Syro-Mesopotamian tradition, developed between the first through the third centuries A.