encounter group

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group

 [gro̳p]
1. an assemblage of objects having certain things in common.
2. a number of atoms forming a recognizable and usually transferable portion of a molecule.
activity g's groups of individuals with similar needs for occupational therapy who are working on the correction of problems that they hold in common.
azo group the bivalent radical, -N=N-.
blood group see blood group.
control group see control (def. 3).
Diagnosis-Related G's see diagnosis-related groups.
encounter group a sensitivity group in which the members strive to gain emotional rather than intellectual insight, with emphasis on the expression of interpersonal feelings in the group situation.
focus g's individuals with a common interest who meet to explore a problem in depth.
PLT group [psittacosis-lymphogranuloma venereum-trachoma] alternative name for genus Chlamydia.
prosthetic group
1. an organic radical, nonprotein in nature, which together with a protein carrier forms an enzyme.
2. a cofactor tightly bound to an enzyme, i.e., it is an integral part of the enzyme and not readily dissociated from it.
3. a cofactor that may reversibly dissociate from the protein component of an enzyme; a coenzyme.
sensitivity group (sensitivity training group) a nonclinical group intended for persons without severe emotional problems, focusing on self-awareness, self-understanding, and interpersonal interactions and aiming to develop skills in leadership, management, counseling, or other roles. Called also T-group and training group.
support group
1. a group made up of individuals with a common problem, usually meeting to express feelings, vent frustrations, and explore effective coping strategies. Education is a component of some support groups.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of a group environment to provide emotional support and health-related information for members.
support group (omaha) in the omaha system, regular planned gatherings to accomplish some compatible goal.
group therapy a form of psychotherapy in which a group of patients meets regularly with a group leader, usually a therapist. The group may be balanced, having patients with diverse problems and attitudes, or it may be composed of patients who all have similar diagnoses or issues to resolve. In some groups, patients may be basically mentally healthy but trying to work through external stressors, such as job loss, natural disasters, or physical illness. Self-help groups are groups of people with a commonality of diagnosis (e.g., alcoholism, overeating, or a particular chronic physical illness) or of experience (e.g., rape, incest) and a leader who may be not a therapist but rather one who has experienced a similar problem or situation.

From hearing how the group leader or other members feel about this behavior, the patient may gain insight into his or her anxieties and conflicts. The group may provide emotional support for self-revelation and a structured environment for trying out new ways of relating to people. In contrast, there are other groups that focus on altering behavior, with less or minimal attention paid to gaining insight into the causes of the problems.
therapy group in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the application of psychotherapeutic techniques to a group, including the utilization of interactions between members of the group. See also group therapy.
training group sensitivity group.

en·coun·ter group

a form of psychological sensitivity training that emphasizes the experiencing of individual relationships within the group and minimizes intellectual and didactic input; the group focuses on the present rather than concerning itself with the past or outside problems of its members.
See also: sensitivity training group.

encounter group

n.
A typically unstructured psychotherapy group in which the participants seek to increase their sensitivity, responsiveness, and emotional expressiveness, as by freely verbalizing and responding to emotions.

encounter group

(in psychology) a small group of people who meet to increase self-awareness, promote personal growth, and improve interpersonal communication. Members focus on becoming aware of their feelings and on developing the ability to express those feelings openly, honestly, and clearly. See also group therapy, psychotherapy, sensitivity training group.

encounter group

Sensitivity group Psychiatry A psychotherapist-directed meeting of similarly out-of-their-minded people who attempt, en masse, to resolve shared conflicts or anxieties, by ↑ self-awareness and understanding of group dynamics

en·coun·ter group

(en-kown'tĕr grūp)
A form of psychological sensitivity training that emphasizes the experiencing of individual relationships within the group and minimizes intellectual and didactic input; the group focuses on the present rather than concerning itself with the past or outside problems of its members.

Encounter group

A form of humanistic therapy in which participants meet with a trained leader to increase self-awareness and social skills through emotional sharing and confrontation.
References in periodicals archive ?
There's no glorified language for those kinds of things," a returning veteran told Austin encounter group members.
And, indeed, when I asked Yona if he would be interested in participating in encounter group meetings with Palestinians who were being interviewed for the study, he gave me a resounding "No
The TRT began in 1992 as an encounter group between descendants of Nazi perpetrators and Jewish Holocaust survivors.
Critics of Rogers's work have argued that client-centered therapy is superficial (De Mott, 1979; Friedenberg, 1971), unworkable with some populations, and unmindful of multicultural and feminist issues (Usher, 1989; Waterhouse, 1993), the social context, and recent advances in behavioral, drug, and alternative therapies; that Rogers's views on human nature are unrealistically optimistic and underestimate human evil (May, 1982); that encounter groups and humanistic psychology have fostered widespread selfishness, narcissism, and moral permissiveness (Coulson, 1988, 1989; Lasch, 1979); and that Rogers's experiments with organizational change were naive (Kirschenbaum, 1979) and counterproductive (Coulson, 1988).
Thus, all points of view can be sensitively represented in the planning and execution of the School for Peace's unique Jewish-Arab encounter groups.
The era satirized by Tom Wolfe in his essay on the "Me Generation" spawned so many encounter groups, so much confessional recitation.
Leaders of encounter groups promoted the instigation of strong emotions, florid displays of feelings and marathons of intimate revelations to strangers.
In 1969, in response to a call for a new political party based on socialism, Duberman writes that: "The sources and manifestations of the revolution lie elsewhere--in a bewildering grab bag that includes hallucinatory drugs, bisexuality, communal pads, dashikis and bluejeans, rock and soul, Eastern mysticism, Scientology, encounter groups, macrobiotic foods, astrology, street theaters and free stores.
In between, she worked as ``an astrologer, a maid, a chemist, a dishwasher,'' and counseled potential suicide victims, made sandwiches, taught nursery school, sold art and led encounter groups until finally settling into her childhood love of writing when none of the jobs seemed to hold any long-term possibilities.
He observed encounter groups and saw that the program was dealing with real issues, not allowing inmates to shift the blame for their mistakes to others, but making them take personal responsibility for their own behavior.