encounter group


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group

 [gro̳p]
1. an assemblage of objects having certain things in common.
2. a number of atoms forming a recognizable and usually transferable portion of a molecule.
activity g's groups of individuals with similar needs for occupational therapy who are working on the correction of problems that they hold in common.
azo group the bivalent radical, -N=N-.
blood group see blood group.
control group see control (def. 3).
Diagnosis-Related G's see diagnosis-related groups.
encounter group a sensitivity group in which the members strive to gain emotional rather than intellectual insight, with emphasis on the expression of interpersonal feelings in the group situation.
focus g's individuals with a common interest who meet to explore a problem in depth.
PLT group [psittacosis-lymphogranuloma venereum-trachoma] alternative name for genus Chlamydia.
prosthetic group
1. an organic radical, nonprotein in nature, which together with a protein carrier forms an enzyme.
2. a cofactor tightly bound to an enzyme, i.e., it is an integral part of the enzyme and not readily dissociated from it.
3. a cofactor that may reversibly dissociate from the protein component of an enzyme; a coenzyme.
sensitivity group (sensitivity training group) a nonclinical group intended for persons without severe emotional problems, focusing on self-awareness, self-understanding, and interpersonal interactions and aiming to develop skills in leadership, management, counseling, or other roles. Called also T-group and training group.
support group
1. a group made up of individuals with a common problem, usually meeting to express feelings, vent frustrations, and explore effective coping strategies. Education is a component of some support groups.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of a group environment to provide emotional support and health-related information for members.
support group (omaha) in the omaha system, regular planned gatherings to accomplish some compatible goal.
group therapy a form of psychotherapy in which a group of patients meets regularly with a group leader, usually a therapist. The group may be balanced, having patients with diverse problems and attitudes, or it may be composed of patients who all have similar diagnoses or issues to resolve. In some groups, patients may be basically mentally healthy but trying to work through external stressors, such as job loss, natural disasters, or physical illness. Self-help groups are groups of people with a commonality of diagnosis (e.g., alcoholism, overeating, or a particular chronic physical illness) or of experience (e.g., rape, incest) and a leader who may be not a therapist but rather one who has experienced a similar problem or situation.

From hearing how the group leader or other members feel about this behavior, the patient may gain insight into his or her anxieties and conflicts. The group may provide emotional support for self-revelation and a structured environment for trying out new ways of relating to people. In contrast, there are other groups that focus on altering behavior, with less or minimal attention paid to gaining insight into the causes of the problems.
therapy group in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the application of psychotherapeutic techniques to a group, including the utilization of interactions between members of the group. See also group therapy.
training group sensitivity group.

en·coun·ter group

a form of psychological sensitivity training that emphasizes the experiencing of individual relationships within the group and minimizes intellectual and didactic input; the group focuses on the present rather than concerning itself with the past or outside problems of its members.
See also: sensitivity training group.

encounter group

n.
A typically unstructured psychotherapy group in which the participants seek to increase their sensitivity, responsiveness, and emotional expressiveness, as by freely verbalizing and responding to emotions.

encounter group

(in psychology) a small group of people who meet to increase self-awareness, promote personal growth, and improve interpersonal communication. Members focus on becoming aware of their feelings and on developing the ability to express those feelings openly, honestly, and clearly. See also group therapy, psychotherapy, sensitivity training group.

encounter group

Sensitivity group Psychiatry A psychotherapist-directed meeting of similarly out-of-their-minded people who attempt, en masse, to resolve shared conflicts or anxieties, by ↑ self-awareness and understanding of group dynamics

en·coun·ter group

(en-kown'tĕr grūp)
A form of psychological sensitivity training that emphasizes the experiencing of individual relationships within the group and minimizes intellectual and didactic input; the group focuses on the present rather than concerning itself with the past or outside problems of its members.

Encounter group

A form of humanistic therapy in which participants meet with a trained leader to increase self-awareness and social skills through emotional sharing and confrontation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dialogue Groups: TRT's Guidelines for Working through Intractable Conflicts by Personal Storytelling in Encounter Groups.
He observed encounter groups and saw that the program was dealing with real issues, not allowing inmates to shift the blame for their mistakes to others, but making them take personal responsibility for their own behavior.
Encounter groups represent the most significant, non-military Jewish presence in Palestinian areas of the West Bank since before the second intifada.
Of course the resort cleaned up its act to became the Esalen Institute, home of "the American awakening" and birthplace of the "human potential" movement where the attractions of Zen manifested themselves in Rolfing, meditation, and encounter groups.
But when a heroin addict kicked drugs after participating in Dederich's brutally confrontational encounter groups, the founder and other members began living communally and promoting Synanon as an addiction cure.
Some women wanted less hostility in the encounter groups, others wanted more female-only encounter groups, and still others wanted to keep parts of the program coed to help them learn how to relate to the opposite sex in nonsexual ways.
She cites 50 years of examples of encounter groups, black psychotherapy, sensitivity trainings, and cultural etiquette books that arose to manage tensions in the postwar integration era.
When Westerners encounter groups like the Nzamba Lela, they sometimes feel uncomfortable because they are so natural that, in a way, they are guileless.