enantiomerism

enantiomerism

 [en-an″te-om´er-izm]
the relationship between two stereoisomers having molecules that are mirror images of each other; enantiomers have identical chemical and physical properties in an achiral environment but form different products when reacted with other chiral molecules and exhibit optical activity. The enantiomer that rotates a beam of polarized light in the clockwise direction is indicated by the prefix (+)-, formerly d- or dextro-; the other enantiomer rotates light in a counterclockwise direction and is indicated by the prefix (−)-, formerly l- or levo-. See also dl-.
Enantiomerism. From Dorland's, 2000.

en·an·ti·om·er·ism

(en-an'tē-om'ĕr-izm),
chemistry isomerism in which the molecules in their configuration are related to one another like an object and its mirror image (enantiomers) and, consequently, are not superimposable; enantiomerism entails optical activity, both enantiomers (in identical amounts) rotating the plane of polarized light equally, but in opposite directions.

enantiomerism

/en·an·ti·om·er·ism/ (en-an″te-om´er-izm) the relationship between two stereoisomers having molecules that are mirror images of each other; they have identical chemical and physical properties in an achiral environment but form different products when reacted with other chiral molecules and exhibit optical activity. The enantiomer that rotates the plane of polarization of a beam of polarized light in the clockwise direction is indicated by the prefix (+)-, formerly d- or dextro-; that rotating the plane of polarization in the counterclockwise direction is indicated by the prefix (−)-, formerly l- or levo-.
Enantiomerism.