enamel

(redirected from enameller)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

enamel

 [e-nam´el]
the white, compact, and very hard substance covering and protecting the dentin of the crown of a tooth.
mottled enamel a chronic endemic form of hypoplasia of the dental enamel caused by drinking water with a high fluoride content when a child is in the time of tooth formation. It is characterized by defective calcification that gives a white chalky appearance to the enamel, which gradually undergoes brown discoloration. See also dental fluorosis.

e·nam·el

(ē-nam'ĕl), [TA]
The hard, glistening substance covering the coronal dentin of the tooth. In its mature form, it is composed of an inorganic portion made up of 90% hydroxyapatite and between 6% calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride, and magnesium carbonate, the remainder (4%) being an organic matrix of protein and glycoprotein.
[M.E., fr. Fr. enamailer, to apply enamel, fr. en, on, + amail, enamel, fr. Germanic]

enamel

/enam·el/ (ĕ-nam´'l)
1. the glazed surface of baked porcelain, metal, or pottery.
2. any hard, smooth, glossy coating.
3. dental enamel; the hard, thin, translucent substance covering and protecting the dentin of a tooth crown and composed almost entirely of calcium salts.

mottled enamel  dental fluorosis: hypoplasia of the dental enamel caused by drinking water with a high fluorine content during the time of tooth formation; characterized by defective calcification that gives a white chalky appearance to the enamel, which gradually undergoes brown discoloration.

enamel

(ĭ-năm′əl)
n.
Anatomy The hard, calcareous substance covering the exposed portion of a tooth.

e·nam′el·er, e·nam′el·ist n.

enamel

[inam′əl]
Etymology: OFr, esmail
the hard, white crystalline substance of the minerals hydroxyapatite and/or fluorapatite that forms the outermost covering of the clinical and anatomical crown of a tooth. It contains no nerves or blood vessels and is the hardest bony substance in the body. It is produced by epithelial cells called ameloblasts.

e·nam·el

(ĕ-nam'ĕl) [TA]
The hard, acellular, inert substance covering the tooth. In its mature form, it is composed of an inorganic portion made up of 90% hydroxyapatite and 6-8% calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride, and magnesium carbonate, the remainder consisting of an organic matrix of protein and glycoprotein; structurally, it is made up of oriented rods each of which consists of a stack of rodlets encased in an organic prism sheath.
[M.E., fr. Fr. enamailer, to apply enamel, fr. en, on, + amail, enamel, fr. Germanic]

enamel

The hard outer covering of the crown of a tooth.

enamel

a substance consisting mainly of a calcium phosphate-carbonate salt, bound together by KERATIN, found on the crowns of teeth and the denticles of fish. It is formed from the EPITHELIUM of the mouth. See TOOTH.

Enamel

The hard, white, outer layer of the tooth.

e·nam·el

(ĕ-nam'ĕl) [TA]
Hard, glistening substance covering coronal dentin of tooth. In its mature form, composed of an inorganic portion made up of 90% hydroxyapatite and about 6% calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride, and magnesium carbonate, with the remainder (4%) being an organic matrix of protein and glycoprotein.
Synonym(s): enamelum [TA] .
[M.E., fr. Fr. enamailer, to apply enamel, fr. en, on, + amail, enamel, fr. Germanic]

enamel

(inam´əl),
n 1. the hard, glistening tissue covering the anatomic crown of the tooth. It is composed mainly of hexagonal rods of hydroxyapatite, sheathed in an organic matrix (approximately 0.15%) and oriented with their long axes approximately at right angles to the surface.
n 2. the outermost layer or covering of the coronal portion of the tooth that overlies and protects the dentin.
enamel bonding,
enamel hypocalcification
n a hereditary condition in which the enamel of the tooth has formed without adequate amounts of mineralization, leaving the surface of the tooth brittle and often stained.

enamel

the white, compact and very hard substance covering and protecting the dentine of the crown of a tooth.

enamel bulge
the area of greatest diameter of a tooth, just external to the gum line, which acts to deflect food from the free gingival margin and the gingival crevice.
enamel epithelium
epithelium which creates a bell-shaped enamel organ, surrounding the dental papilla; the internal epithelium consists of columnar ameloblasts which secrete enamel.
enamel hypoplasia
incomplete or partial development; a common defect in dogs.
inherited enamel defect
an inherited absence of enamel from all teeth combined with excessive flexibility of joints in Holstein-Friesian cattle. The teeth are pink and obviously deficient in substance. A defect in collagen formation is probable.
enamel layer
the outermost layer of cells of the enamel organ.
mottled enamel
dental fluorosis; defective enamel, with a chalky white appearance or brownish stain, caused by excessive amounts of fluorine in drinking water and food preparations during the period of enamel calcification.
enamel organ
an epithelial cap over a dental papilla that develops into the enamel-producing organ. The shape of the enamel organ determines the shape of the tooth.
enamel points
sharp projections of enamel at the junction of the buccal and occlusal surfaces of a tooth. Seen most commonly in horses.
enamel rods
progressively mineralized glycoproteinaceous tubules, the basic structural units of enamel; enamel is acellular and consists of interrod material and rods,
enamel spot
remnant of the enamel cup in the center of an incisor tooth table in a horse.
Enlarge picture
Enamel spot. By permission from Sack W, Wensing CJG, Dyce KM, Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy, Saunders, 2002
enamel works
factories manufacturing enamels or using them extensively; sources of fluorine for pollution of pasture and water.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bath enameller at work - it is a specialist job that calls for skills, <B experience and an emphasis on safety
Dou's early training as an enameller of glass paintings in sharp hues of lilac and rose, gold and green, divorced him from his master's predilection for amorphous shades of grey and brown.
For the former Selly Oak enameller fought at Gallipoli in the Middle Eastern theatre of World War One, went over the top at the Battle of the Somme and fought at the Battle of Passchendaele.
She started her working life in 1912 as an apprentice enameller.
The nine pieces include five decorated by William Beilby (1740-1819), arguably the best glass enameller of his time, and a goblet commemorating the opening of the High Level Bridge over the River Tyne in 1849.
Samuel Lines was born in 1778 and moved from Allesley to Birmingham when he was 16 to become a clock-dial enameller.
His wife now works as an enameller from their Erdington home where she looks after their three children.
The catalogue is dedicated to the memory of the enameller Rachel Gogerly, whose work is included in the exhibition and who died earlier this year.
It is no surprise that the first entry of the book is a political masterpiece commissioned by the stadtholder, Prince Frederick Henry in 1641: a watch whose complex decoration was painted by the Parisian enameller Henry Toutin (1614-83).
I understand that Jean-Baptiste Augustin was an enameller to the restored king of France.
The mum-of-six was born in Liverpool in 1904 and worked as a clock dial enameller on Merseyside before moving to the Midlands with her husband, who died 41 years ago.
Born in Coventry, Mr Lines moved to Birmingham at the age of 16 to take up an apprenticeship as a designer with a clock-dial enameller.